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GWAS-Identified Common Variants for Obesity Are Not Associated with the Risk of Developing Colorectal Cancer

Sainz, Juan; Frank, Bernd; da Silva Filho, Miguel I.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Rudolph, Anja; Butterbach, Katja; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hemminki, Kari LU and Försti, Asta LU (2014) In Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 23(6). p.1125-1128
Abstract
Background: Observational studies have consistently associated obesity with colorectal cancer risk. Because both traits are genetically determined and share some metabolic biomarkers, we hypothesized that obesity-related polymorphisms could also influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive population-based case-control study in 1,792 German colorectal cancer cases and 1,805 controls to explore associations between 28 obesogenic variants identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and colorectal cancer risk. We also evaluated interactions between polymorphisms and body mass index (BMI), type II diabetes (T2D), and gender. Results: No evidence of association between obesogenic... (More)
Background: Observational studies have consistently associated obesity with colorectal cancer risk. Because both traits are genetically determined and share some metabolic biomarkers, we hypothesized that obesity-related polymorphisms could also influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive population-based case-control study in 1,792 German colorectal cancer cases and 1,805 controls to explore associations between 28 obesogenic variants identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and colorectal cancer risk. We also evaluated interactions between polymorphisms and body mass index (BMI), type II diabetes (T2D), and gender. Results: No evidence of association between obesogenic variants and colorectal cancer risk was observed after correction for multiple testing. There was only a remarkable interaction between the LTA(rs1041981) polymorphism and gender, which modified the risk of colorectal cancer [P-interaction - 0.002; males: odds ratio (OR), 1.14; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.00-1.30 vs. females: OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71-0.97]. Conclusions: Our findings showed that obesogenic variants are not a major pathogenetic risk factor for colorectal cancer. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
volume
23
issue
6
pages
1125 - 1128
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research
external identifiers
  • wos:000345270800026
  • scopus:84903377041
ISSN
1538-7755
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1354
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
13716d21-e47d-4d20-8665-ca6312a98555 (old id 4985780)
date added to LUP
2015-02-03 07:17:47
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:10:26
@article{13716d21-e47d-4d20-8665-ca6312a98555,
  abstract     = {Background: Observational studies have consistently associated obesity with colorectal cancer risk. Because both traits are genetically determined and share some metabolic biomarkers, we hypothesized that obesity-related polymorphisms could also influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive population-based case-control study in 1,792 German colorectal cancer cases and 1,805 controls to explore associations between 28 obesogenic variants identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and colorectal cancer risk. We also evaluated interactions between polymorphisms and body mass index (BMI), type II diabetes (T2D), and gender. Results: No evidence of association between obesogenic variants and colorectal cancer risk was observed after correction for multiple testing. There was only a remarkable interaction between the LTA(rs1041981) polymorphism and gender, which modified the risk of colorectal cancer [P-interaction - 0.002; males: odds ratio (OR), 1.14; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.00-1.30 vs. females: OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71-0.97]. Conclusions: Our findings showed that obesogenic variants are not a major pathogenetic risk factor for colorectal cancer.},
  author       = {Sainz, Juan and Frank, Bernd and da Silva Filho, Miguel I. and Hoffmeister, Michael and Rudolph, Anja and Butterbach, Katja and Chang-Claude, Jenny and Brenner, Hermann and Hemminki, Kari and Försti, Asta},
  issn         = {1538-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1125--1128},
  publisher    = {American Association for Cancer Research},
  series       = {Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention},
  title        = {GWAS-Identified Common Variants for Obesity Are Not Associated with the Risk of Developing Colorectal Cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1354},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2014},
}