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Self-identified thermal comfort zone and perceived climate changes: a questionnaire study in temperate, tropical and cold climates

Kim, Yung-Bin; Roh, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Rokho; Sohn, Juhee; Lee, Joeun; Wijayanto, Titis; Muhamed, Ahmad Munir Che; Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Kim, Siyeon LU and Lee, Joo-Young (2017) The 17th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics p.59-59
Abstract
The present study was conducted to explore self-identified thermal comfort zone and the perceived climate changes of indigenes who live in temperate, tropical and cold climates. A questionnaire study was carried out in the following seven countries: Mongol (Bsk by Köppen’s climate classification), Sweden (Cfb), Korea (Dwa), Japan (Cfa), Fiji (Af), Indonesia (Af), and Malaysia (Af). A total of 125 Mongolians, 83 Swedish, 240 Koreans, 231 Japanese, 391 Fijian, 101 Malaysians, and 137 Indonesians participated in this questionnaire from Oct 2016-Jan 2017. The questionnaire consisted of 52 questions on self-identified thermal tolerance, behavioural thermoregulation, thermal neutral zone, thermal comfort, and perceived climate changes. The... (More)
The present study was conducted to explore self-identified thermal comfort zone and the perceived climate changes of indigenes who live in temperate, tropical and cold climates. A questionnaire study was carried out in the following seven countries: Mongol (Bsk by Köppen’s climate classification), Sweden (Cfb), Korea (Dwa), Japan (Cfa), Fiji (Af), Indonesia (Af), and Malaysia (Af). A total of 125 Mongolians, 83 Swedish, 240 Koreans, 231 Japanese, 391 Fijian, 101 Malaysians, and 137 Indonesians participated in this questionnaire from Oct 2016-Jan 2017. The questionnaire consisted of 52 questions on self-identified thermal tolerance, behavioural thermoregulation, thermal neutral zone, thermal comfort, and perceived climate changes. The questionnaire was cross-translated between languages based on an original English version. The results showed that the self-identified thermal comfort zone in the summer or wet season was higher for tropical indigenes (24~27 °C for Malaysians and Indonesians) than for indigenes in cold climates (18~21°C for Mongolians and Swedish). For the winter or dry season, similar results were found. Interestingly, 21.8 % of Mongolians preferred indoor temperature lower than 15 °C whereas 25.0 % of Malaysians preferred indoor temperature higher than 27 °C in the winter (or dry) season. In particular, Koreans and Fijian perceived hotter summers and colder winters due to climate changes during the last five years when compared to other people. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
pages
1 pages
conference name
The 17th International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics
conference location
Kobe, Japan
conference dates
2017-11-12 - 2017-11-18
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4a60c9d6-812c-431e-a9c4-710d71a81df9
alternative location
http://icee2017.h.kobe-u.ac.jp/ICEE2017_c/Scientific_Program_files/Book_Abstracts_ICEE2017.pdf
date added to LUP
2017-12-04 19:51:51
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:36:23
@misc{4a60c9d6-812c-431e-a9c4-710d71a81df9,
  abstract     = {The present study was conducted to explore self-identified thermal comfort zone and the perceived climate changes of indigenes who live in temperate, tropical and cold climates. A questionnaire study was carried out in the following seven countries: Mongol (Bsk by Köppen’s climate classification), Sweden (Cfb), Korea (Dwa), Japan (Cfa), Fiji (Af), Indonesia (Af), and Malaysia (Af). A total of 125 Mongolians, 83 Swedish, 240 Koreans, 231 Japanese, 391 Fijian, 101 Malaysians, and 137 Indonesians participated in this questionnaire from Oct 2016-Jan 2017. The questionnaire consisted of 52 questions on self-identified thermal tolerance, behavioural thermoregulation, thermal neutral zone, thermal comfort, and perceived climate changes. The questionnaire was cross-translated between languages based on an original English version. The results showed that the self-identified thermal comfort zone in the summer or wet season was higher for tropical indigenes (24~27 °C for Malaysians and Indonesians) than for indigenes in cold climates (18~21°C for Mongolians and Swedish). For the winter or dry season, similar results were found. Interestingly, 21.8 % of Mongolians preferred indoor temperature lower than 15 °C whereas 25.0 % of Malaysians preferred indoor temperature higher than 27 °C in the winter (or dry) season. In particular, Koreans and Fijian perceived hotter summers and colder winters due to climate changes during the last five years when compared to other people.},
  author       = {Kim, Yung-Bin and Roh, Sang-Hyun and Kim, Rokho and Sohn, Juhee and Lee, Joeun and Wijayanto, Titis and Muhamed, Ahmad Munir Che and Kuklane, Kalev and Kim, Siyeon and Lee, Joo-Young},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Kobe, Japan},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {59--59},
  title        = {Self-identified thermal comfort zone and perceived climate changes: a questionnaire study in temperate, tropical and cold climates},
  year         = {2017},
}