Advanced

Likelihood of admission to hospital from the emergency department is not universally associated with hospital bed occupancy at the time of admission

Tolestam Heyman, Ellen LU ; Engström, Martin LU ; Baigi, Amir LU ; Dahlén Holmqvist, Lina and Lingman, Markus (2021) In International Journal of Health Planning and Management 36(2). p.353-363
Abstract

Background: The decision to admit into the hospital from the emergency department (ED) is considered to be important and challenging. The aim was to assess whether previously published results suggesting an association between hospital bed occupancy and likelihood of hospital admission from the ED can be reproduced in a different study population. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of attendances at two Swedish EDs in 2015 was performed. Admission to hospital was assessed in relation to hospital bed occupancy together with other clinically relevant variables. Hospital bed occupancy was categorized and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results: In total 89,503 patient attendances were included in the... (More)

Background: The decision to admit into the hospital from the emergency department (ED) is considered to be important and challenging. The aim was to assess whether previously published results suggesting an association between hospital bed occupancy and likelihood of hospital admission from the ED can be reproduced in a different study population. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of attendances at two Swedish EDs in 2015 was performed. Admission to hospital was assessed in relation to hospital bed occupancy together with other clinically relevant variables. Hospital bed occupancy was categorized and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results: In total 89,503 patient attendances were included in the final analysis. Of those, 29.1% resulted in admission within 24 h. The mean hospital bed occupancy by the hour of the two hospitals was 87.1% (SD 7.6). In both the univariate and multivariate analysis, odds ratio for admission within 24 h from the ED did not decrease significantly with an increasing hospital bed occupancy. Conclusions: A negative association between admission to hospital and occupancy level, as reported elsewhere, was not replicated. This suggests that the previously shown association might not be universal but may vary across sites due to setting specific circumstances.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
admission rate, disposition decision, emergency department, emergency medicine, hospital bed occupancy
in
International Journal of Health Planning and Management
volume
36
issue
2
pages
353 - 363
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85092324724
  • pmid:33037715
ISSN
0749-6753
DOI
10.1002/hpm.3086
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4a90652f-7624-4e9b-8657-f84de54441cb
date added to LUP
2020-10-22 16:46:24
date last changed
2021-06-08 02:30:49
@article{4a90652f-7624-4e9b-8657-f84de54441cb,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: The decision to admit into the hospital from the emergency department (ED) is considered to be important and challenging. The aim was to assess whether previously published results suggesting an association between hospital bed occupancy and likelihood of hospital admission from the ED can be reproduced in a different study population. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of attendances at two Swedish EDs in 2015 was performed. Admission to hospital was assessed in relation to hospital bed occupancy together with other clinically relevant variables. Hospital bed occupancy was categorized and univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Results: In total 89,503 patient attendances were included in the final analysis. Of those, 29.1% resulted in admission within 24 h. The mean hospital bed occupancy by the hour of the two hospitals was 87.1% (SD 7.6). In both the univariate and multivariate analysis, odds ratio for admission within 24 h from the ED did not decrease significantly with an increasing hospital bed occupancy. Conclusions: A negative association between admission to hospital and occupancy level, as reported elsewhere, was not replicated. This suggests that the previously shown association might not be universal but may vary across sites due to setting specific circumstances.</p>},
  author       = {Tolestam Heyman, Ellen and Engström, Martin and Baigi, Amir and Dahlén Holmqvist, Lina and Lingman, Markus},
  issn         = {0749-6753},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {353--363},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {International Journal of Health Planning and Management},
  title        = {Likelihood of admission to hospital from the emergency department is not universally associated with hospital bed occupancy at the time of admission},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hpm.3086},
  doi          = {10.1002/hpm.3086},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2021},
}