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Long-term response of soil microbial communities to fire and fire-fighting chemicals

Barreiro, A.; Martín, A.; Carballas, T. and Díaz-Raviña, M. (2016) In Biology and Fertility of Soils 52(7). p.963-975
Abstract

Wildfires are a global problem that can require the application of fire-fighting chemicals for combating them. These compounds can have negative effects on forest ecosystems; however, there are few studies about their influence on the soil microbial community. The aim of this work is to analyse under field conditions the impact of a prescribed fire and the addition at normal field doses of three different fire-fighting chemicals (foaming agent, ammonium polyphosphate, Firesorb) on different soil properties, 10 years after the fire and retardant addition. The study was performed in a Humic Cambisol under scrubland located in Galicia (NW Spain). Several physical, physicochemical, chemical (water holding capacity, pH, electric... (More)

Wildfires are a global problem that can require the application of fire-fighting chemicals for combating them. These compounds can have negative effects on forest ecosystems; however, there are few studies about their influence on the soil microbial community. The aim of this work is to analyse under field conditions the impact of a prescribed fire and the addition at normal field doses of three different fire-fighting chemicals (foaming agent, ammonium polyphosphate, Firesorb) on different soil properties, 10 years after the fire and retardant addition. The study was performed in a Humic Cambisol under scrubland located in Galicia (NW Spain). Several physical, physicochemical, chemical (water holding capacity, pH, electric conductivity, total C and N, hydro-soluble C and carbohydrates), biochemical and microbiological [biomass C, enzyme activities, respiration, bacterial growth, fungal biomass and growth, biomass and community composition by the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pattern] properties were analysed in the 0–2- and 2–5-cm soil layers. A marked effect of soil depth and no effects of prescribed fire on most analysed properties were observed, suggesting that soil chemical quality was recovered after 10 years, although changes in microbial community composition were still detected 10 years after the prescribed fire and the retardant addition. The PLFA pattern combined with principal component analysis allows us to differentiate the microbial communities according to both soil depth and soil treatment. The ammonium polyphosphate was the fire-fighting chemical with the strongest effects on the composition of soil microbial communities, which is in accordance with marked changes observed in vegetation.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bacterial and fungal growth, Biochemical properties, Fire retardants, PLFA pattern, Prescribed fires
in
Biology and Fertility of Soils
volume
52
issue
7
pages
13 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:84979258348
  • wos:000384420200006
ISSN
0178-2762
DOI
10.1007/s00374-016-1133-5
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
4afa1d83-cd3c-4ffe-a98b-46e4c0562c16
date added to LUP
2016-10-27 11:23:00
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:37:41
@article{4afa1d83-cd3c-4ffe-a98b-46e4c0562c16,
  abstract     = {<p>Wildfires are a global problem that can require the application of fire-fighting chemicals for combating them. These compounds can have negative effects on forest ecosystems; however, there are few studies about their influence on the soil microbial community. The aim of this work is to analyse under field conditions the impact of a prescribed fire and the addition at normal field doses of three different fire-fighting chemicals (foaming agent, ammonium polyphosphate, Firesorb) on different soil properties, 10 years after the fire and retardant addition. The study was performed in a Humic Cambisol under scrubland located in Galicia (NW Spain). Several physical, physicochemical, chemical (water holding capacity, pH, electric conductivity, total C and N, hydro-soluble C and carbohydrates), biochemical and microbiological [biomass C, enzyme activities, respiration, bacterial growth, fungal biomass and growth, biomass and community composition by the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) pattern] properties were analysed in the 0–2- and 2–5-cm soil layers. A marked effect of soil depth and no effects of prescribed fire on most analysed properties were observed, suggesting that soil chemical quality was recovered after 10 years, although changes in microbial community composition were still detected 10 years after the prescribed fire and the retardant addition. The PLFA pattern combined with principal component analysis allows us to differentiate the microbial communities according to both soil depth and soil treatment. The ammonium polyphosphate was the fire-fighting chemical with the strongest effects on the composition of soil microbial communities, which is in accordance with marked changes observed in vegetation.</p>},
  author       = {Barreiro, A. and Martín, A. and Carballas, T. and Díaz-Raviña, M.},
  issn         = {0178-2762},
  keyword      = {Bacterial and fungal growth,Biochemical properties,Fire retardants,PLFA pattern,Prescribed fires},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {963--975},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Biology and Fertility of Soils},
  title        = {Long-term response of soil microbial communities to fire and fire-fighting chemicals},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-016-1133-5},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2016},
}