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Prevalence of STI symptoms and high levels of stigma in STI healthcare among men who have sex with men in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania : a respondent-driven sampling study

Ross, Michael W; Larsson, Markus LU ; Nyoni, Joyce E. and Agardh, Anette LU (2017) In International journal of STD & AIDS 28(9). p.925-928
Abstract

Symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), whether they are presented for treatment or diagnosis, and how they are received by the clinician where they are presented, may be concomitants of stigma associated with homosexuality in homophobic climates. We analyzed respondent-driven sampling data from a study on 200 young men who have sex with men (MSM) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania to examine sample prevalence, treatment and clinician response to 10 symptoms potentially associated with STIs. Survey measures included 10 self-reported STI symptoms, further specified according to location (genital, anal, oral), further specified according to place of diagnosis, place of, treatment whether there was pharmacy treatment or... (More)

Symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), whether they are presented for treatment or diagnosis, and how they are received by the clinician where they are presented, may be concomitants of stigma associated with homosexuality in homophobic climates. We analyzed respondent-driven sampling data from a study on 200 young men who have sex with men (MSM) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania to examine sample prevalence, treatment and clinician response to 10 symptoms potentially associated with STIs. Survey measures included 10 self-reported STI symptoms, further specified according to location (genital, anal, oral), further specified according to place of diagnosis, place of, treatment whether there was pharmacy treatment or self-medication, healthcare worker (HCW) inquiries about source of infection and whether the HCW was polite. Most common symptoms reported were genital pain, burning urination, genital itching/burning, penile discharge, and groin swelling. Anal symptoms had the lowest proportion of treatment at public clinics and among the highest proportion of pharmacy treatment; anal sores had the highest proportion of self-medication. HCWs were reported as not being polite in response to 71–90% of the symptoms, (median = 82%). The findings suggest that stigma and negative HCW response are barriers to public clinic treatment for MSM in Tanzania and that these may have implications for both STI treatment and the HIV cascade.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Africa, diagnosis, homosexual, men, treatment
in
International journal of STD & AIDS
volume
28
issue
9
pages
4 pages
external identifiers
  • scopus:85023759383
  • wos:000405272100011
ISSN
0956-4624
DOI
10.1177/0956462416683625
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4b52ed42-e0ba-4998-acdb-a683d05f9eea
date added to LUP
2017-07-31 11:22:37
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:40:29
@article{4b52ed42-e0ba-4998-acdb-a683d05f9eea,
  abstract     = {<p>Symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), whether they are presented for treatment or diagnosis, and how they are received by the clinician where they are presented, may be concomitants of stigma associated with homosexuality in homophobic climates. We analyzed respondent-driven sampling data from a study on 200 young men who have sex with men (MSM) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania to examine sample prevalence, treatment and clinician response to 10 symptoms potentially associated with STIs. Survey measures included 10 self-reported STI symptoms, further specified according to location (genital, anal, oral), further specified according to place of diagnosis, place of, treatment whether there was pharmacy treatment or self-medication, healthcare worker (HCW) inquiries about source of infection and whether the HCW was polite. Most common symptoms reported were genital pain, burning urination, genital itching/burning, penile discharge, and groin swelling. Anal symptoms had the lowest proportion of treatment at public clinics and among the highest proportion of pharmacy treatment; anal sores had the highest proportion of self-medication. HCWs were reported as not being polite in response to 71–90% of the symptoms, (median = 82%). The findings suggest that stigma and negative HCW response are barriers to public clinic treatment for MSM in Tanzania and that these may have implications for both STI treatment and the HIV cascade.</p>},
  author       = {Ross, Michael W and Larsson, Markus and Nyoni, Joyce E. and Agardh, Anette},
  issn         = {0956-4624},
  keyword      = {Africa,diagnosis,homosexual,men,treatment},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {925--928},
  series       = {International journal of STD & AIDS},
  title        = {Prevalence of STI symptoms and high levels of stigma in STI healthcare among men who have sex with men in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania : a respondent-driven sampling study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956462416683625},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2017},
}