Advanced

Individual Variation in Influenza A Virus Infection Histories and Long-Term Immune Responses in Mallards

Tolf, Conny; Latorre-Margalef, Neus LU ; Wille, Michelle; Bengtsson, Daniel; Gunnarsson, Gunnar; Grosbois, Vladimir; Hasselquist, Dennis LU ; Olsen, Björn; Elmberg, Johan and Waldenström, Jonas LU (2013) In PLoS ONE 8(4).
Abstract
Wild dabbling ducks (genus Anas) are the main reservoir for influenza A virus (IAV) in the Northern Hemisphere. Current understanding of disease dynamics and epidemiology in this virus-host system has primarily been based on population-level surveillance studies and infection experiments conducted in laboratory settings. Using a combined experimental-natural approach with wild-strain captive mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), we monitored individual IAV infection histories and immunological responses of 10 birds over the course of 15 months. This is the first detailed study to track natural IAV infection histories over several seasons amongst the same individuals growing from juvenile to adults. The general trends in the infection histories of... (More)
Wild dabbling ducks (genus Anas) are the main reservoir for influenza A virus (IAV) in the Northern Hemisphere. Current understanding of disease dynamics and epidemiology in this virus-host system has primarily been based on population-level surveillance studies and infection experiments conducted in laboratory settings. Using a combined experimental-natural approach with wild-strain captive mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), we monitored individual IAV infection histories and immunological responses of 10 birds over the course of 15 months. This is the first detailed study to track natural IAV infection histories over several seasons amongst the same individuals growing from juvenile to adults. The general trends in the infection histories of the monitored birds reflected seasonal variation in prevalence at the population level. However, within the study group there were significant differences between individuals in infection frequency as well as in short and long term anti-IAV antibody response. Further observations included individual variation in the number of infecting virus subtypes, and a strong tendency for long-lasting hemagglutinin-related homosubtypic immunity. Specifically, all infections in the second autumn, except one, were of different subtypes compared to the first autumn. The variation among birds concerning these epidemiologically important traits illustrates the necessity for IAV studies to move from the level of populations to examine individuals in order to further our understanding of IAV disease and epidemiology. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
PLoS ONE
volume
8
issue
4
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • wos:000318008400029
  • scopus:84876577520
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0061201
project
CAnMove
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4cc378d1-0745-4141-b632-78a0a25de42c (old id 3847378)
date added to LUP
2013-06-20 12:21:05
date last changed
2019-03-19 02:11:14
@article{4cc378d1-0745-4141-b632-78a0a25de42c,
  abstract     = {Wild dabbling ducks (genus Anas) are the main reservoir for influenza A virus (IAV) in the Northern Hemisphere. Current understanding of disease dynamics and epidemiology in this virus-host system has primarily been based on population-level surveillance studies and infection experiments conducted in laboratory settings. Using a combined experimental-natural approach with wild-strain captive mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), we monitored individual IAV infection histories and immunological responses of 10 birds over the course of 15 months. This is the first detailed study to track natural IAV infection histories over several seasons amongst the same individuals growing from juvenile to adults. The general trends in the infection histories of the monitored birds reflected seasonal variation in prevalence at the population level. However, within the study group there were significant differences between individuals in infection frequency as well as in short and long term anti-IAV antibody response. Further observations included individual variation in the number of infecting virus subtypes, and a strong tendency for long-lasting hemagglutinin-related homosubtypic immunity. Specifically, all infections in the second autumn, except one, were of different subtypes compared to the first autumn. The variation among birds concerning these epidemiologically important traits illustrates the necessity for IAV studies to move from the level of populations to examine individuals in order to further our understanding of IAV disease and epidemiology.},
  articleno    = {e61201},
  author       = {Tolf, Conny and Latorre-Margalef, Neus and Wille, Michelle and Bengtsson, Daniel and Gunnarsson, Gunnar and Grosbois, Vladimir and Hasselquist, Dennis and Olsen, Björn and Elmberg, Johan and Waldenström, Jonas},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {Individual Variation in Influenza A Virus Infection Histories and Long-Term Immune Responses in Mallards},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0061201},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2013},
}