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Development of Plasmodium falciparum specific naïve, atypical, memory and plasma B cells during infancy and in adults in an endemic area

Lugaajju, Allan; Reddy, Sreenivasulu B.; Wahlgren, Mats; Kironde, Fred and Persson, Kristina E M LU (2017) In Malaria Journal 16(1).
Abstract

Background: B-cells are essential in immunity against malaria, but which sub-sets of B-cells specifically recognize Plasmodium falciparum and when they appear is still largely unknown. Results: Using the flow cytometry technique for detection of P. falciparum specific (Pf+) B-cells, this study for the first time measured the development of Pf+ B cell (CD19+) phenotypes in Ugandan babies from birth up to nine months, and in their mothers. The babies showed increases in Pf+ IgG memory B-cells (MBCs), atypical MBCs, and plasma cells/blasts over time, but the proportion of these cells were still lower than in the mothers who displayed stable levels (5, 18, and 3%, respectively). Pf+ non-IgG+ MBCs and naïve B-cells binding to P. falciparum... (More)

Background: B-cells are essential in immunity against malaria, but which sub-sets of B-cells specifically recognize Plasmodium falciparum and when they appear is still largely unknown. Results: Using the flow cytometry technique for detection of P. falciparum specific (Pf+) B-cells, this study for the first time measured the development of Pf+ B cell (CD19+) phenotypes in Ugandan babies from birth up to nine months, and in their mothers. The babies showed increases in Pf+ IgG memory B-cells (MBCs), atypical MBCs, and plasma cells/blasts over time, but the proportion of these cells were still lower than in the mothers who displayed stable levels (5, 18, and 3%, respectively). Pf+ non-IgG+ MBCs and naïve B-cells binding to P. falciparum antigens were higher in the babies compared to the mothers (12 and 50%). In ELISA there was an increase in IgG and IgM antibodies over time in babies, and stable levels in mothers. At baby delivery, multigravidae mothers had a higher proportion of Pf+ IgG MBCs and less Pf+ naïve B-cells than primigravidae mothers. Conclusions: In newborns, naïve B-cells are a major player in recognizing P. falciparum. In adults, the high proportion of Pf+ atypical MBCs suggests a major role for these cells. Both in infants and adults, non-IgG+ MBCs were higher than IgG MBCs, indicating that these cells deserve more focus in future.

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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Atypical, B-cells, Immunity, Malaria, Memory, Plasmodium falciparum
in
Malaria Journal
volume
16
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85009945399
  • wos:000392761400001
ISSN
1475-2875
DOI
10.1186/s12936-017-1697-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d20ac60-0b66-44e7-b3d2-82b8385dbf29
date added to LUP
2017-02-03 15:28:14
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:48:07
@article{4d20ac60-0b66-44e7-b3d2-82b8385dbf29,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: B-cells are essential in immunity against malaria, but which sub-sets of B-cells specifically recognize Plasmodium falciparum and when they appear is still largely unknown. Results: Using the flow cytometry technique for detection of P. falciparum specific (Pf+) B-cells, this study for the first time measured the development of Pf+ B cell (CD19+) phenotypes in Ugandan babies from birth up to nine months, and in their mothers. The babies showed increases in Pf+ IgG memory B-cells (MBCs), atypical MBCs, and plasma cells/blasts over time, but the proportion of these cells were still lower than in the mothers who displayed stable levels (5, 18, and 3%, respectively). Pf+ non-IgG+ MBCs and naïve B-cells binding to P. falciparum antigens were higher in the babies compared to the mothers (12 and 50%). In ELISA there was an increase in IgG and IgM antibodies over time in babies, and stable levels in mothers. At baby delivery, multigravidae mothers had a higher proportion of Pf+ IgG MBCs and less Pf+ naïve B-cells than primigravidae mothers. Conclusions: In newborns, naïve B-cells are a major player in recognizing P. falciparum. In adults, the high proportion of Pf+ atypical MBCs suggests a major role for these cells. Both in infants and adults, non-IgG+ MBCs were higher than IgG MBCs, indicating that these cells deserve more focus in future.</p>},
  articleno    = {37},
  author       = {Lugaajju, Allan and Reddy, Sreenivasulu B. and Wahlgren, Mats and Kironde, Fred and Persson, Kristina E M},
  issn         = {1475-2875},
  keyword      = {Atypical,B-cells,Immunity,Malaria,Memory,Plasmodium falciparum},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Malaria Journal},
  title        = {Development of Plasmodium falciparum specific naïve, atypical, memory and plasma B cells during infancy and in adults in an endemic area},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-017-1697-z},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2017},
}