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Borderlands matter in the Museum

Gradén, Lizette LU (2017) Borderlands in Swedish-America
Abstract (Swedish)
In the last decade, many museums that were established in the 20th century in the United States by immigrants from Scandinavian and Nordic countries have become increasingly concerned with broadening their audiences. In cities such as Seattle and Minneapolis, efforts to do this have varied from offering cocktail hours and culinary conferences in striving to appeal to people who may not identify as Nordic or do not think of museums as places they would normally visit. These efforts stem from the growing expectations museums face of demonstrating how they serve a public benefit and support social values at play in society at large, but they also stem from the demands museums face of providing results of annual growth to their financial... (More)
In the last decade, many museums that were established in the 20th century in the United States by immigrants from Scandinavian and Nordic countries have become increasingly concerned with broadening their audiences. In cities such as Seattle and Minneapolis, efforts to do this have varied from offering cocktail hours and culinary conferences in striving to appeal to people who may not identify as Nordic or do not think of museums as places they would normally visit. These efforts stem from the growing expectations museums face of demonstrating how they serve a public benefit and support social values at play in society at large, but they also stem from the demands museums face of providing results of annual growth to their financial stakeholders. As leaders of these museums explain, they can no longer attract paying visitors with heritage collections and volunteer staff. But how does the revitalization and augmentation work when a very particular heritage is under a museum’s auspices? (Less)
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author
organization
alternative title
Borderlands matter in the Museum.
publishing date
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Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
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Borderlands in Swedish-America
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4e0b5065-eb59-444c-9b87-7c2d047e2c9d
date added to LUP
2018-01-31 17:16:11
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:15:20
@misc{4e0b5065-eb59-444c-9b87-7c2d047e2c9d,
  abstract     = {In the last decade, many museums that were established in the 20th century in the United States by immigrants from Scandinavian and Nordic countries have become increasingly concerned with broadening their audiences. In cities such as Seattle and Minneapolis, efforts to do this have varied from offering cocktail hours and culinary conferences in striving to appeal to people who may not identify as Nordic or do not think of museums as places they would normally visit. These efforts stem from the growing expectations museums face of demonstrating how they serve a public benefit and support social values at play in society at large, but they also stem from the demands museums face of providing results of annual growth to their financial stakeholders. As leaders of these museums explain, they can no longer attract paying visitors with heritage collections and volunteer staff.  But how does the revitalization and augmentation work when a very particular heritage is under a museum’s auspices?   },
  author       = {Gradén, Lizette},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Borderlands matter in the Museum},
  year         = {2017},
}