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Cost effectiveness of an intervention focused on reducing bathing disability

Zingmark, Magnus LU ; Nilsson, Ingeborg ; Norström, Fredrik ; Sahlén, Klas Göran and Lindholm, Lars LU (2017) In European Journal of Ageing 14. p.233-241
Abstract

The onset of bathing disability among older people is critical for a decline in functioning and has implications for both the individuals' quality of life and societal costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term cost effectiveness of an intervention targeting bathing disability among older people. For hypothetical cohorts of community-dwelling older people with bathing disability, transitions between states of dependency and death were modelled over 8 years including societal costs. A five-state Markov model based on states of dependency was used to evaluate Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs from a societal perspective. An intervention group was compared with a no intervention control group. The intervention... (More)

The onset of bathing disability among older people is critical for a decline in functioning and has implications for both the individuals' quality of life and societal costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term cost effectiveness of an intervention targeting bathing disability among older people. For hypothetical cohorts of community-dwelling older people with bathing disability, transitions between states of dependency and death were modelled over 8 years including societal costs. A five-state Markov model based on states of dependency was used to evaluate Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs from a societal perspective. An intervention group was compared with a no intervention control group. The intervention focused on promoting safe and independent performance of bathing-related tasks. The intervention effect, based on previously published trials, was applied in the model as a 1.4 increased probability of recovery during the first year. Over the full follow-up period, the intervention resulted in QALY gains and reduced societal cost. After 8 years, the intervention resulted in 0.052 QALYs gained and reduced societal costs by €2410 per person. In comparison to the intervention cost, the intervention effect was a more important factor for the magnitude of QALY gains and long-term societal costs. The intervention cost had only minor impact on societal costs. The conclusion was that an intervention targeting bathing disability among older people presents a cost-effective use of resources and leads to both QALY gains and reduced societal costs over 8 years.

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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Ageing
volume
14
pages
233 - 241
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:84997839845
  • pmid:28936134
ISSN
1613-9372
DOI
10.1007/s10433-016-0404-1
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
4f85cb55-526d-4c02-ae03-e71818792a81
date added to LUP
2020-05-29 16:39:19
date last changed
2020-10-20 02:48:32
@article{4f85cb55-526d-4c02-ae03-e71818792a81,
  abstract     = {<p>The onset of bathing disability among older people is critical for a decline in functioning and has implications for both the individuals' quality of life and societal costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term cost effectiveness of an intervention targeting bathing disability among older people. For hypothetical cohorts of community-dwelling older people with bathing disability, transitions between states of dependency and death were modelled over 8 years including societal costs. A five-state Markov model based on states of dependency was used to evaluate Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and costs from a societal perspective. An intervention group was compared with a no intervention control group. The intervention focused on promoting safe and independent performance of bathing-related tasks. The intervention effect, based on previously published trials, was applied in the model as a 1.4 increased probability of recovery during the first year. Over the full follow-up period, the intervention resulted in QALY gains and reduced societal cost. After 8 years, the intervention resulted in 0.052 QALYs gained and reduced societal costs by €2410 per person. In comparison to the intervention cost, the intervention effect was a more important factor for the magnitude of QALY gains and long-term societal costs. The intervention cost had only minor impact on societal costs. The conclusion was that an intervention targeting bathing disability among older people presents a cost-effective use of resources and leads to both QALY gains and reduced societal costs over 8 years.</p>},
  author       = {Zingmark, Magnus and Nilsson, Ingeborg and Norström, Fredrik and Sahlén, Klas Göran and Lindholm, Lars},
  issn         = {1613-9372},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {233--241},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Ageing},
  title        = {Cost effectiveness of an intervention focused on reducing bathing disability},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10433-016-0404-1},
  doi          = {10.1007/s10433-016-0404-1},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2017},
}