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Tjernobylkatastrofen : apokalyps eller pånyttfödelse?

Lindbladh, Johanna LU (2014) In Nordisk Østforum 28(3). p.239-257
Abstract
This article explores the different ways in which the nuclear catastrophe at the Chernobyl plant in 1986 is represented in selected films and novels produced and written since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. The most common way of imagining Chernobyl during this period is the apocalypse foreshadowing the collapse of the Soviet Union. However, it is also viewed as the catalyst for resurrection, promising a new way of life after the fall of the Soviet Union, liberated from Soviet heroism and war culture. Interestingly, the catastrophe zone as the symbol of resurrection can be identified in the literature written before Chernobyl as well, which in this article is illustrated by examples from Andrei Tarkovskii’s film Stalker and the... (More)
This article explores the different ways in which the nuclear catastrophe at the Chernobyl plant in 1986 is represented in selected films and novels produced and written since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. The most common way of imagining Chernobyl during this period is the apocalypse foreshadowing the collapse of the Soviet Union. However, it is also viewed as the catalyst for resurrection, promising a new way of life after the fall of the Soviet Union, liberated from Soviet heroism and war culture. Interestingly, the catastrophe zone as the symbol of resurrection can be identified in the literature written before Chernobyl as well, which in this article is illustrated by examples from Andrei Tarkovskii’s film Stalker and the nuclear physicist Grigorii Medvedev’s short novel The Powerplant. (Less)
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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Chernobyl, apocalypse, resurrection, Grigorii Medvedev, Andrei Tarkovskii, Viktor Alekseiev, Aleksandr Esaulov, Aleksandr Mindadze, Oksana Bajrak
in
Nordisk Østforum
volume
28
issue
3
pages
239 - 257
publisher
Cappelen Damm Akademisk
ISSN
0801-7220
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
98cbb368-377c-4977-a172-23773240fb55 (old id 5038221)
alternative location
https://www.idunn.no/nof/2014/03/tjernobylkatastrofen_apokalyps_eller_paanyttfdelse_
date added to LUP
2015-01-30 12:54:13
date last changed
2016-04-15 13:47:40
@article{98cbb368-377c-4977-a172-23773240fb55,
  abstract     = {This article explores the different ways in which the nuclear catastrophe at the Chernobyl plant in 1986 is represented in selected films and novels produced and written since the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. The most common way of imagining Chernobyl during this period is the apocalypse foreshadowing the collapse of the Soviet Union. However, it is also viewed as the catalyst for resurrection, promising a new way of life after the fall of the Soviet Union, liberated from Soviet heroism and war culture. Interestingly, the catastrophe zone as the symbol of resurrection can be identified in the literature written before Chernobyl as well, which in this article is illustrated by examples from Andrei Tarkovskii’s film Stalker and the nuclear physicist Grigorii Medvedev’s short novel The Powerplant.},
  author       = {Lindbladh, Johanna},
  issn         = {0801-7220},
  keyword      = {Chernobyl,apocalypse,resurrection,Grigorii Medvedev,Andrei Tarkovskii,Viktor Alekseiev,Aleksandr Esaulov,Aleksandr Mindadze,Oksana Bajrak},
  language     = {swe},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {239--257},
  publisher    = {Cappelen Damm Akademisk},
  series       = {Nordisk Østforum},
  title        = {Tjernobylkatastrofen : apokalyps eller pånyttfödelse?},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2014},
}