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Asymmetric isolating barriers between different microclimatic environments caused by low immigrant survival.

Gosden, Thomas LU ; Waller, John LU and Svensson, Erik LU (2015) In Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences 282(1802).
Abstract
Spatially variable selection has the potential to result in local adaptation unless counteracted by gene flow. Therefore, barriers to gene flow will help facilitate divergence between populations that differ in local selection pressures. We performed spatially and temporally replicated reciprocal field transplant experiments between inland and coastal habitats using males of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) as our study organism. Males from coastal populations had lower local survival rates than resident males at inland sites, whereas we detected no differences between immigrant and resident males at coastal sites, suggesting asymmetric local adaptation in a source-sink system. There were no intrinsic differences in... (More)
Spatially variable selection has the potential to result in local adaptation unless counteracted by gene flow. Therefore, barriers to gene flow will help facilitate divergence between populations that differ in local selection pressures. We performed spatially and temporally replicated reciprocal field transplant experiments between inland and coastal habitats using males of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) as our study organism. Males from coastal populations had lower local survival rates than resident males at inland sites, whereas we detected no differences between immigrant and resident males at coastal sites, suggesting asymmetric local adaptation in a source-sink system. There were no intrinsic differences in longevity between males from the different environments suggesting that the observed differences in male survival are environment-dependent and probably caused by local adaptation. Furthermore, the coastal environment was found to be warmer and drier than the inland environment, further suggesting local adaptation to microclimatic factors has lead to differential survival of resident and immigrant males. Our results suggest that low survival of immigrant males mediates isolation between closely located populations inhabiting different microclimatic environments. (Less)
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences
volume
282
issue
1802
publisher
Royal Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:25631994
  • wos:000350344900014
  • scopus:84921978886
ISSN
1471-2954
DOI
10.1098/rspb.2014.2459
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
708c59d2-edb7-45a7-bece-d13a955b2fed (old id 5039079)
date added to LUP
2015-02-26 13:34:09
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:04:22
@article{708c59d2-edb7-45a7-bece-d13a955b2fed,
  abstract     = {Spatially variable selection has the potential to result in local adaptation unless counteracted by gene flow. Therefore, barriers to gene flow will help facilitate divergence between populations that differ in local selection pressures. We performed spatially and temporally replicated reciprocal field transplant experiments between inland and coastal habitats using males of the common blue damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) as our study organism. Males from coastal populations had lower local survival rates than resident males at inland sites, whereas we detected no differences between immigrant and resident males at coastal sites, suggesting asymmetric local adaptation in a source-sink system. There were no intrinsic differences in longevity between males from the different environments suggesting that the observed differences in male survival are environment-dependent and probably caused by local adaptation. Furthermore, the coastal environment was found to be warmer and drier than the inland environment, further suggesting local adaptation to microclimatic factors has lead to differential survival of resident and immigrant males. Our results suggest that low survival of immigrant males mediates isolation between closely located populations inhabiting different microclimatic environments.},
  articleno    = {20142459},
  author       = {Gosden, Thomas and Waller, John and Svensson, Erik},
  issn         = {1471-2954},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1802},
  publisher    = {Royal Society},
  series       = {Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences},
  title        = {Asymmetric isolating barriers between different microclimatic environments caused by low immigrant survival.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2014.2459},
  volume       = {282},
  year         = {2015},
}