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Improving barley culm robustness for secured crop yield in a changing climate.

Dockter, Christoph and Hansson, Mats LU (2015) In Journal of Experimental Botany 66(12). p.3499-3509
Abstract
The Green Revolution combined advancements in breeding and agricultural practice, and provided food security to millions of people. Daily food supply is still a major issue in many parts of the world and is further challenged by future climate change. Fortunately, life science research is currently making huge progress, and the development of future crop plants will be explored. Today, plant breeding typically follows one gene per trait. However, new scientific achievements have revealed that many of these traits depend on different genes and complex interactions of proteins reacting to various external stimuli. These findings open up new possibilities for breeding where variations in several genes can be combined to enhance productivity... (More)
The Green Revolution combined advancements in breeding and agricultural practice, and provided food security to millions of people. Daily food supply is still a major issue in many parts of the world and is further challenged by future climate change. Fortunately, life science research is currently making huge progress, and the development of future crop plants will be explored. Today, plant breeding typically follows one gene per trait. However, new scientific achievements have revealed that many of these traits depend on different genes and complex interactions of proteins reacting to various external stimuli. These findings open up new possibilities for breeding where variations in several genes can be combined to enhance productivity and quality. In this review we present an overview of genes determining plant architecture in barley, with a special focus on culm length. Many genes are currently known only through their mutant phenotypes, but emerging genomic sequence information will accelerate their identification. More than 1000 different short-culm barley mutants have been isolated and classified in different phenotypic groups according to culm length and additional pleiotropic characters. Some mutants have been connected to deficiencies in biosynthesis and reception of brassinosteroids and gibberellic acids. Still other mutants are unlikely to be connected to these hormones. The genes and corresponding mutations are of potential interest for development of stiff-straw crop plants tolerant to lodging, which occurs in extreme weather conditions with strong winds and heavy precipitation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Experimental Botany
volume
66
issue
12
pages
3499 - 3509
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25614659
  • wos:000356665500007
  • scopus:84928019726
ISSN
0022-0957
DOI
10.1093/jxb/eru521
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
69b1bd20-428f-4b26-afb0-f18243366a7a (old id 5039944)
date added to LUP
2015-02-26 13:33:14
date last changed
2017-07-02 03:13:47
@article{69b1bd20-428f-4b26-afb0-f18243366a7a,
  abstract     = {The Green Revolution combined advancements in breeding and agricultural practice, and provided food security to millions of people. Daily food supply is still a major issue in many parts of the world and is further challenged by future climate change. Fortunately, life science research is currently making huge progress, and the development of future crop plants will be explored. Today, plant breeding typically follows one gene per trait. However, new scientific achievements have revealed that many of these traits depend on different genes and complex interactions of proteins reacting to various external stimuli. These findings open up new possibilities for breeding where variations in several genes can be combined to enhance productivity and quality. In this review we present an overview of genes determining plant architecture in barley, with a special focus on culm length. Many genes are currently known only through their mutant phenotypes, but emerging genomic sequence information will accelerate their identification. More than 1000 different short-culm barley mutants have been isolated and classified in different phenotypic groups according to culm length and additional pleiotropic characters. Some mutants have been connected to deficiencies in biosynthesis and reception of brassinosteroids and gibberellic acids. Still other mutants are unlikely to be connected to these hormones. The genes and corresponding mutations are of potential interest for development of stiff-straw crop plants tolerant to lodging, which occurs in extreme weather conditions with strong winds and heavy precipitation.},
  author       = {Dockter, Christoph and Hansson, Mats},
  issn         = {0022-0957},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {3499--3509},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
  title        = {Improving barley culm robustness for secured crop yield in a changing climate.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/eru521},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2015},
}