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The Evolution of HIV-1 Interactions with Coreceptors and Mannose C-Type Lectin Receptors.

Borggren, Marie LU and Jansson, Marianne LU (2015) In Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science 129. p.109-140
Abstract
The phenotype of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) commonly evolves between and within infected individuals, at virus transmission, and during disease progression. This evolution includes altered interactions between the virus and its coreceptors, i.e., chemokine receptors, as well as mannose C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Transmitted/founder viruses are predominantly restricted to CCR5, whereas the subsequent intrapatient evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor use during progressive disease can be subdivided into two distinct pathways. Accordingly, the CCR5-restricted virus population is either gradually replaced by virus variants able to use CXCR4 or evolves toward an altered, more flexible use of CCR5. Despite a strong dependency on... (More)
The phenotype of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) commonly evolves between and within infected individuals, at virus transmission, and during disease progression. This evolution includes altered interactions between the virus and its coreceptors, i.e., chemokine receptors, as well as mannose C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Transmitted/founder viruses are predominantly restricted to CCR5, whereas the subsequent intrapatient evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor use during progressive disease can be subdivided into two distinct pathways. Accordingly, the CCR5-restricted virus population is either gradually replaced by virus variants able to use CXCR4 or evolves toward an altered, more flexible use of CCR5. Despite a strong dependency on these coreceptors for host cell entry, HIV-1 also interacts with other cell surface molecules during target cell attachment, including the CLRs. The virus interaction with the CLRs may result either in the efficient transfer of virus to CD4(+) T cells or in the degradation of the virus in endosomal compartments. The determinants of the diverse outcomes depend on which CLR is engaged and also on the glycan makeup of the envelope glycoproteins, which may evolve with the strength of the immune pressure during the disease course. With the current clinical introduction of CCR5 antagonists and the development of additional entry inhibitors, knowledge on the evolution and baseline characteristics of HIV-1 interactions with coreceptor and CLR interactions may play important roles for individualized and optimized treatment strategies. This review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of HIV-1 interactions with these receptors. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science
volume
129
pages
109 - 140
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25595802
  • scopus:84920772149
ISSN
1877-1173
DOI
10.1016/bs.pmbts.2014.10.004
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b470ab6-db61-4182-9e35-aefdb5794b82 (old id 5040263)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25595802?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-02-03 18:02:34
date last changed
2017-05-21 04:35:55
@article{8b470ab6-db61-4182-9e35-aefdb5794b82,
  abstract     = {The phenotype of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) commonly evolves between and within infected individuals, at virus transmission, and during disease progression. This evolution includes altered interactions between the virus and its coreceptors, i.e., chemokine receptors, as well as mannose C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Transmitted/founder viruses are predominantly restricted to CCR5, whereas the subsequent intrapatient evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor use during progressive disease can be subdivided into two distinct pathways. Accordingly, the CCR5-restricted virus population is either gradually replaced by virus variants able to use CXCR4 or evolves toward an altered, more flexible use of CCR5. Despite a strong dependency on these coreceptors for host cell entry, HIV-1 also interacts with other cell surface molecules during target cell attachment, including the CLRs. The virus interaction with the CLRs may result either in the efficient transfer of virus to CD4(+) T cells or in the degradation of the virus in endosomal compartments. The determinants of the diverse outcomes depend on which CLR is engaged and also on the glycan makeup of the envelope glycoproteins, which may evolve with the strength of the immune pressure during the disease course. With the current clinical introduction of CCR5 antagonists and the development of additional entry inhibitors, knowledge on the evolution and baseline characteristics of HIV-1 interactions with coreceptor and CLR interactions may play important roles for individualized and optimized treatment strategies. This review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of HIV-1 interactions with these receptors.},
  author       = {Borggren, Marie and Jansson, Marianne},
  issn         = {1877-1173},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {109--140},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science},
  title        = {The Evolution of HIV-1 Interactions with Coreceptors and Mannose C-Type Lectin Receptors.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.pmbts.2014.10.004},
  volume       = {129},
  year         = {2015},
}