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Ēode ϸā tō setle - Female Leadership in Iron Age Uppåkra

Rosengren, Erika LU (2008) In Lund Archaeological Review 13-14. 2007-2008. p.19-30
Abstract
In the Uppåkra house the place for a possible high seat dedicated to the woman is marked out by a deposit consisting of a bronze beaker with embossed gold-foil bands and a glass bowl originated from the area around the Black Sea. These objects acted as props in the drinking ceremonies and social activities involving gift giving carried out by the queen or the lady of the house. The exclusive nature of these objects as well as the functions in which they were used by the woman illuminate her importance in the aristocratic hall and grant her a similar seat, as can be identified depicted on some of the Gotlandic picture stones. In the written sources several female characters can be identified, and it is plausible that the women in Iron Age... (More)
In the Uppåkra house the place for a possible high seat dedicated to the woman is marked out by a deposit consisting of a bronze beaker with embossed gold-foil bands and a glass bowl originated from the area around the Black Sea. These objects acted as props in the drinking ceremonies and social activities involving gift giving carried out by the queen or the lady of the house. The exclusive nature of these objects as well as the functions in which they were used by the woman illuminate her importance in the aristocratic hall and grant her a similar seat, as can be identified depicted on some of the Gotlandic picture stones. In the written sources several female characters can be identified, and it is plausible that the women in Iron Age society, especially the lady/queen, did uphold some if not all of these. Some of the female aspects found in the written accounts include the provocative Hetzerin or valkyrie, the sorcery-working völva and the divinatory norn. Through these abilities the lady and/or queen acted as an advisor and a mediator between the king and his retinue of warriors and as such could influence the course of action. This intermediate relationship between male and female roles as earthly equivalents to Odin and Freyja is essential to the interpretation of the Uppåkra house as weil as the high seat dedicated to the woman. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Women's studies, Archaeology, Prehistoric Archaeology, Iron Age, Viking Age, Uppåkra
in
Lund Archaeological Review
volume
13-14. 2007-2008
pages
19 - 30
publisher
Institute of Archaeology, University of Lund
ISSN
1401-2189
DOI
10.13140/2.1.4514.3361
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
880c680a-0078-4397-aae7-c3fb82a3c532 (old id 5041728)
date added to LUP
2015-02-02 13:35:20
date last changed
2016-04-15 23:15:21
@article{880c680a-0078-4397-aae7-c3fb82a3c532,
  abstract     = {In the Uppåkra house the place for a possible high seat dedicated to the woman is marked out by a deposit consisting of a bronze beaker with embossed gold-foil bands and a glass bowl originated from the area around the Black Sea. These objects acted as props in the drinking ceremonies and social activities involving gift giving carried out by the queen or the lady of the house. The exclusive nature of these objects as well as the functions in which they were used by the woman illuminate her importance in the aristocratic hall and grant her a similar seat, as can be identified depicted on some of the Gotlandic picture stones. In the written sources several female characters can be identified, and it is plausible that the women in Iron Age society, especially the lady/queen, did uphold some if not all of these. Some of the female aspects found in the written accounts include the provocative Hetzerin or valkyrie, the sorcery-working völva and the divinatory norn. Through these abilities the lady and/or queen acted as an advisor and a mediator between the king and his retinue of warriors and as such could influence the course of action. This intermediate relationship between male and female roles as earthly equivalents to Odin and Freyja is essential to the interpretation of the Uppåkra house as weil as the high seat dedicated to the woman.},
  author       = {Rosengren, Erika},
  issn         = {1401-2189},
  keyword      = {Women's studies,Archaeology,Prehistoric Archaeology,Iron Age,Viking Age,Uppåkra},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {19--30},
  publisher    = {Institute of Archaeology, University of Lund},
  series       = {Lund Archaeological Review},
  title        = {Ēode ϸā tō setle - Female Leadership in Iron Age Uppåkra},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/2.1.4514.3361},
  volume       = {13-14. 2007-2008},
  year         = {2008},
}