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Infections and endothelial cell apoptosis

Pesonen, Erkki LU ; Muusfeldt Birck, Malene; Liuba, Petru LU ; Odermarsky, Michal LU ; Persson, Kenneth LU ; Kornerup Hansen, Axel and Saraste, Antti (2010) In Cardiology in the Young 20(Suppl 1). p.224-224
Abstract
Objectives: Endothelial cells of coronary arteries undergo apoptosis in patients with coronary artery disease. Carotid artery ultrasound studies show that after acute infections intima media thickness is increased. The possible effects of infections on endothelial cell apoptosis and the presence of apoptosis in early life remain unknown. Methods: Chlamydia pneumonia was inoculated three times at three weeks intervals to half of 32 piglets starting at the age of 8 weeks. Half of the piglets received cholesterol feeding. Morphological studies were done at the age of 19 weeks. Right coronary arteries were carefully excised and trimmed for excess tissue. The vessels were cut perpendicular to the long axis and sectioned at 5-μm thickness.... (More)
Objectives: Endothelial cells of coronary arteries undergo apoptosis in patients with coronary artery disease. Carotid artery ultrasound studies show that after acute infections intima media thickness is increased. The possible effects of infections on endothelial cell apoptosis and the presence of apoptosis in early life remain unknown. Methods: Chlamydia pneumonia was inoculated three times at three weeks intervals to half of 32 piglets starting at the age of 8 weeks. Half of the piglets received cholesterol feeding. Morphological studies were done at the age of 19 weeks. Right coronary arteries were carefully excised and trimmed for excess tissue. The vessels were cut perpendicular to the long axis and sectioned at 5-μm thickness. TUNEL-assay was based on nick end labelling and staining of internucleosomal DNA fragments that are the biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. The percentage of apoptotic endothelial cells from intact endothe-lial cells was calculated using light microscopy. Results. Endothelial apoptosis appeared in 0.13% (SD 0.30%) of endothelial cells of non-infected piglets but in 0.75% (SD 0.62) of infected piglets (p <0.005, t-test). In piglets fed with normal diet apoptosis appeared in 1.1% but in those on cholesterol rich diet the prevalence of apoptosis was lower 0.43% (SD 0.42). Conclusions: Infections amplify endothelial cell apoptosis. The finding supports the notion that infection has a pro-atherogenic effect particularly in early life. Hypercholesterolemic diet did not further stimulate apoptosis. (Less)
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published
subject
keywords
cholesterol, DNA, DNA fragment, apoptosis, endothelium cell, infection, heart surgery, cardiology, piglet, diet, TUNEL assay, microscopy, Student t test, prevalence, atherogenesis, coronary artery, patient, coronary artery disease, carotid artery, ultrasound, Chlamydia, pneumonia, cholesterol intake, right coronary artery, tissues, thickness, staining, arterial wall thickness
in
Cardiology in the Young
volume
20
issue
Suppl 1
pages
1 pages
publisher
Cambridge University Press
ISSN
1467-1107
DOI
10.1017/S1047951109991946
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
505ea4d6-2239-46d5-9ea4-d2789dddd816
date added to LUP
2017-07-21 10:33:48
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:26:23
@misc{505ea4d6-2239-46d5-9ea4-d2789dddd816,
  abstract     = {Objectives: Endothelial cells of coronary arteries undergo apoptosis in patients with coronary artery disease. Carotid artery ultrasound studies show that after acute infections intima media thickness is increased. The possible effects of infections on endothelial cell apoptosis and the presence of apoptosis in early life remain unknown. Methods: Chlamydia pneumonia was inoculated three times at three weeks intervals to half of 32 piglets starting at the age of 8 weeks. Half of the piglets received cholesterol feeding. Morphological studies were done at the age of 19 weeks. Right coronary arteries were carefully excised and trimmed for excess tissue. The vessels were cut perpendicular to the long axis and sectioned at 5-μm thickness. TUNEL-assay was based on nick end labelling and staining of internucleosomal DNA fragments that are the biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. The percentage of apoptotic endothelial cells from intact endothe-lial cells was calculated using light microscopy. Results. Endothelial apoptosis appeared in 0.13% (SD 0.30%) of endothelial cells of non-infected piglets but in 0.75% (SD 0.62) of infected piglets (p &lt;0.005, t-test). In piglets fed with normal diet apoptosis appeared in 1.1% but in those on cholesterol rich diet the prevalence of apoptosis was lower 0.43% (SD 0.42). Conclusions: Infections amplify endothelial cell apoptosis. The finding supports the notion that infection has a pro-atherogenic effect particularly in early life. Hypercholesterolemic diet did not further stimulate apoptosis.},
  author       = {Pesonen, Erkki and Muusfeldt Birck, Malene and Liuba, Petru and Odermarsky, Michal and Persson, Kenneth and Kornerup Hansen, Axel and Saraste, Antti},
  issn         = {1467-1107},
  keyword      = {cholesterol,DNA,DNA fragment,apoptosis,endothelium cell,infection,heart surgery,cardiology,piglet,diet,TUNEL assay,microscopy,Student t test,prevalence,atherogenesis,coronary artery,patient,coronary artery disease,carotid artery,ultrasound,Chlamydia,pneumonia,cholesterol intake,right coronary artery,tissues,thickness,staining,arterial wall thickness},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  note         = {Conference Abstract},
  number       = {Suppl 1},
  pages        = {224--224},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Cardiology in the Young},
  title        = {Infections and endothelial cell apoptosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1047951109991946},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2010},
}