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Hygroscopic growth and cloud forming potential of Arctic aerosol based on observed chemical and physical characteristics (a 1 year study 2007-2008)

Silvergren, Sanna LU ; Wideqvist, U.; Stroem, J.; Sjogren, S. and Svenningsson, Birgitta LU (2014) In Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 119(24). p.14080-14097
Abstract
Aerosol particle samples were collected, and the particle size distribution was measured during 1 year at the Zeppelin station (474 m asl) on Svalbard. The chemical constituents, hygroscopicity, and cloud forming properties of the aerosol were analyzed. The aerosol contained mostly sulfate and nitrate during the summer, whereas from September to February the main components were sodium and chloride. The highest concentration (20%) of water-soluble organic matter was sampled in December. The hygroscopic growth factors for the water-soluble fraction were 1.56-2.01 at 90% relative humidity, peaking in October, when the measured supersaturations needed for cloud drop formation were also the lowest. Sea-salt components showed a positive... (More)
Aerosol particle samples were collected, and the particle size distribution was measured during 1 year at the Zeppelin station (474 m asl) on Svalbard. The chemical constituents, hygroscopicity, and cloud forming properties of the aerosol were analyzed. The aerosol contained mostly sulfate and nitrate during the summer, whereas from September to February the main components were sodium and chloride. The highest concentration (20%) of water-soluble organic matter was sampled in December. The hygroscopic growth factors for the water-soluble fraction were 1.56-2.01 at 90% relative humidity, peaking in October, when the measured supersaturations needed for cloud drop formation were also the lowest. Sea-salt components showed a positive correlation with the cloud forming capability, whereas the organic content had no correlation. The hygroscopicity factors, or kappa values, were determined in three ways for each month: (1)kappa(H-TDMA) from measurements of the hygroscopic growth of particles produced from atomization of the filter extracts, (2)kappa(CCNC) from measurements of the critical supersaturation as a function of size for these particles, and (3)kappa(chem) was modeled based on the organic and inorganic composition of the filter samples. Using the measured particle size distributions and the critical activation diameters from the Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC) measurements, it was found that the number of CCN varied more with supersaturation during the summer months. The best agreement between all three kappa values was in December and January. Comparisons with earlier studies do not suggest any trend in the Arctic aerosol seasonal variability over the last decade. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
volume
119
issue
24
pages
14080 - 14097
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000348460000026
  • scopus:84921436588
ISSN
2169-8996
DOI
10.1002/2014JD021657
project
MERGE
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a74ccdd-9744-4205-bd9f-70b6ea96e286 (old id 5063197)
date added to LUP
2015-02-25 09:24:39
date last changed
2017-10-08 03:10:01
@article{0a74ccdd-9744-4205-bd9f-70b6ea96e286,
  abstract     = {Aerosol particle samples were collected, and the particle size distribution was measured during 1 year at the Zeppelin station (474 m asl) on Svalbard. The chemical constituents, hygroscopicity, and cloud forming properties of the aerosol were analyzed. The aerosol contained mostly sulfate and nitrate during the summer, whereas from September to February the main components were sodium and chloride. The highest concentration (20%) of water-soluble organic matter was sampled in December. The hygroscopic growth factors for the water-soluble fraction were 1.56-2.01 at 90% relative humidity, peaking in October, when the measured supersaturations needed for cloud drop formation were also the lowest. Sea-salt components showed a positive correlation with the cloud forming capability, whereas the organic content had no correlation. The hygroscopicity factors, or kappa values, were determined in three ways for each month: (1)kappa(H-TDMA) from measurements of the hygroscopic growth of particles produced from atomization of the filter extracts, (2)kappa(CCNC) from measurements of the critical supersaturation as a function of size for these particles, and (3)kappa(chem) was modeled based on the organic and inorganic composition of the filter samples. Using the measured particle size distributions and the critical activation diameters from the Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC) measurements, it was found that the number of CCN varied more with supersaturation during the summer months. The best agreement between all three kappa values was in December and January. Comparisons with earlier studies do not suggest any trend in the Arctic aerosol seasonal variability over the last decade.},
  author       = {Silvergren, Sanna and Wideqvist, U. and Stroem, J. and Sjogren, S. and Svenningsson, Birgitta},
  issn         = {2169-8996},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {24},
  pages        = {14080--14097},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
  title        = {Hygroscopic growth and cloud forming potential of Arctic aerosol based on observed chemical and physical characteristics (a 1 year study 2007-2008)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2014JD021657},
  volume       = {119},
  year         = {2014},
}