Advanced

Protective clothing in hot environments

Holmér, Ingvar LU (2006) In Industrial Health 44(3). p.404-413
Abstract
The high level of protection required by personal protective clothing (PPC) severely impedes heat exchange by sweat evaporation. As a result work associated with wearing PPC, particularly in hot environments, implies considerable physiological strain and may render workers exhausted in a short time. Recent development of algorithms for describing the heat transfer, accounting for pumping and wind effects, comprises improvement of the prediction of thermal stress. Realistic corrections can then be made to the available measures of thermal insulation and evaporative resistance of a given clothing ensemble. Currently this information is incorporated in international standards for assessment of thermal environments. Factors, such as... (More)
The high level of protection required by personal protective clothing (PPC) severely impedes heat exchange by sweat evaporation. As a result work associated with wearing PPC, particularly in hot environments, implies considerable physiological strain and may render workers exhausted in a short time. Recent development of algorithms for describing the heat transfer, accounting for pumping and wind effects, comprises improvement of the prediction of thermal stress. Realistic corrections can then be made to the available measures of thermal insulation and evaporative resistance of a given clothing ensemble. Currently this information is incorporated in international standards for assessment of thermal environments. Factors, such as directional radiation and wetting of layers, were studied in a recently completed EU research project. The development of advanced thermal manikins and measurement procedures should provide better measures for predictive models. As with all methods and models, the results need validation in realistic wear trials in order to prove their relevance and accuracy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
physiological strain, prediction models, protective clothing, heat stress, standards, climate indices
in
Industrial Health
volume
44
issue
3
pages
404 - 413
publisher
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan
external identifiers
  • pmid:16922184
  • wos:000239473700009
  • scopus:33747389018
ISSN
1880-8026
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
51011cee-1e10-4a66-8420-45b73fa69c7c (old id 399138)
alternative location
http://www.jniosh.go.jp/old/niih/en/indu_hel/2006/pdf/indhealth_44_3_404.pdf
date added to LUP
2007-10-05 10:25:39
date last changed
2019-08-14 02:53:31
@article{51011cee-1e10-4a66-8420-45b73fa69c7c,
  abstract     = {The high level of protection required by personal protective clothing (PPC) severely impedes heat exchange by sweat evaporation. As a result work associated with wearing PPC, particularly in hot environments, implies considerable physiological strain and may render workers exhausted in a short time. Recent development of algorithms for describing the heat transfer, accounting for pumping and wind effects, comprises improvement of the prediction of thermal stress. Realistic corrections can then be made to the available measures of thermal insulation and evaporative resistance of a given clothing ensemble. Currently this information is incorporated in international standards for assessment of thermal environments. Factors, such as directional radiation and wetting of layers, were studied in a recently completed EU research project. The development of advanced thermal manikins and measurement procedures should provide better measures for predictive models. As with all methods and models, the results need validation in realistic wear trials in order to prove their relevance and accuracy.},
  author       = {Holmér, Ingvar},
  issn         = {1880-8026},
  keyword      = {physiological strain,prediction models,protective clothing,heat stress,standards,climate indices},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {404--413},
  publisher    = {National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan},
  series       = {Industrial Health},
  title        = {Protective clothing in hot environments},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2006},
}