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Investigating the Applicability of Agility Assessment Surveys: A Case Study

Jalalia, Samireh; Wohlin, Claes and Angelis, Lefteris (2014) In Journal of Systems and Software 98. p.172-190
Abstract
Context



Agile software development has become popular in the past decade without being sufficiently defined. The Agile principles can be instantiated differently which creates different perceptions of Agility. This has resulted in several frameworks being presented in the research literature to evaluate the level of Agility. However, the evidence of their actual use in practice is limited.



Objective



The objective is to identify online surveys that assess/profile Agility in practice, and to evaluate the surveys in an industrial setting.



Method



The Agility assessment surveys were identified through searching the web. Then, they were explored and... (More)
Context



Agile software development has become popular in the past decade without being sufficiently defined. The Agile principles can be instantiated differently which creates different perceptions of Agility. This has resulted in several frameworks being presented in the research literature to evaluate the level of Agility. However, the evidence of their actual use in practice is limited.



Objective



The objective is to identify online surveys that assess/profile Agility in practice, and to evaluate the surveys in an industrial setting.



Method



The Agility assessment surveys were identified through searching the web. Then, they were explored and two surveys were identified as most promising for our objective. The selected surveys were evaluated in a case study with three Agile teams in a software consultancy company.



Results



Each team and its customer separately judged the team's Agility. This outcome was compared with the two survey results in focus-group meetings, and finally one of the surveys was agreed to provide a more holistic assessment of Agility.



Conclusions



Different surveys may judge Agility differently, which supports the viewpoint that Agile is not well defined. Therefore, practitioners must decide what Agile means to them and select the assessment survey that matches their definition.





Abbreviations

CI, Continuous integration;

GSD, Global software development;

PP, Pair programming;

RQ, Research question;

S1, Survey 1;

S2, Survey 2;

TDD, Test driven development;

TR, Trouble report;

T1, Team 1;

T2, Team 2;

T3, Team 3;

XP, Extreme programming (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Agile, Assessment, Survey
in
Journal of Systems and Software
volume
98
pages
172 - 190
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84908296633
ISSN
0164-1212
DOI
10.1016/j.jss.2014.08.067
project
EASE
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
486cc416-1cca-4a81-ba13-3ddbe0c3cb9b (old id 5104462)
date added to LUP
2015-02-24 14:54:19
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:41:31
@article{486cc416-1cca-4a81-ba13-3ddbe0c3cb9b,
  abstract     = {Context<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Agile software development has become popular in the past decade without being sufficiently defined. The Agile principles can be instantiated differently which creates different perceptions of Agility. This has resulted in several frameworks being presented in the research literature to evaluate the level of Agility. However, the evidence of their actual use in practice is limited.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objective<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The objective is to identify online surveys that assess/profile Agility in practice, and to evaluate the surveys in an industrial setting.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Method<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The Agility assessment surveys were identified through searching the web. Then, they were explored and two surveys were identified as most promising for our objective. The selected surveys were evaluated in a case study with three Agile teams in a software consultancy company.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Each team and its customer separately judged the team's Agility. This outcome was compared with the two survey results in focus-group meetings, and finally one of the surveys was agreed to provide a more holistic assessment of Agility.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Different surveys may judge Agility differently, which supports the viewpoint that Agile is not well defined. Therefore, practitioners must decide what Agile means to them and select the assessment survey that matches their definition.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Abbreviations<br/><br>
CI, Continuous integration; <br/><br>
GSD, Global software development; <br/><br>
PP, Pair programming; <br/><br>
RQ, Research question; <br/><br>
S1, Survey 1; <br/><br>
S2, Survey 2; <br/><br>
TDD, Test driven development; <br/><br>
TR, Trouble report; <br/><br>
T1, Team 1; <br/><br>
T2, Team 2; <br/><br>
T3, Team 3; <br/><br>
XP, Extreme programming},
  author       = {Jalalia, Samireh and Wohlin, Claes and Angelis, Lefteris},
  issn         = {0164-1212},
  keyword      = {Agile,Assessment,Survey},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {172--190},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Systems and Software},
  title        = {Investigating the Applicability of Agility Assessment Surveys: A Case Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2014.08.067},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2014},
}