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The aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis in adolescents and adults - Fusobacterium necrophorum is commonly found.

Hedin, Katarina LU ; Bieber, L; Lindh, M and Sundqvist, M (2015) In Clinical Microbiology and Infection 21(3). p.1-263
Abstract
Sore throat is common in primary healthcare. Aetiological studies have focused on the presence of a limited number of pathogens. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of a wide range of bacteria and viruses, including Fusobacterium necrophorum, in patients with pharyngotonsillitis and in asymptomatic controls. A prospective case control study was performed in primary healthcare in Kronoberg County, Sweden. Patients (n=220) aged 15 to 45 years with a suspected acute pharyngotonsillitis, and controls (n=128), were included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed for β-hemolytic streptococci, F. necrophorum, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and 13 respiratory viruses. Serum samples were... (More)
Sore throat is common in primary healthcare. Aetiological studies have focused on the presence of a limited number of pathogens. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of a wide range of bacteria and viruses, including Fusobacterium necrophorum, in patients with pharyngotonsillitis and in asymptomatic controls. A prospective case control study was performed in primary healthcare in Kronoberg County, Sweden. Patients (n=220) aged 15 to 45 years with a suspected acute pharyngotonsillitis, and controls (n=128), were included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed for β-hemolytic streptococci, F. necrophorum, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and 13 respiratory viruses. Serum samples were analysed for antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. The patient history and symptoms, including Centor score, were analysed in relation to pathogens. In 155/220 (70.5%) of the patients, as compared to 26/128 (20.3%) of the controls (p <0.001), at least one microorganism was found. Group A streptococci, F. necrophorum, and influenza B virus were the three most common findings, and all significantly more common in patients than in controls (p <0.001, p 0.001, and p 0.002, respectively). Patients with F. necrophorum only (n=14) displayed a lower Centor score than patients with Group A streptococcus only (n=46), but a higher score than patients with influenza B, other viruses, or no potential pathogen (Kruskal-Wallis p <0.001). A pathogen was detected in 70% of the patients, displaying a wide range of pathogens contributing to the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis. This study supports F. necrophorum as one of the pathogens to be considered in the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Microbiology and Infection
volume
21
issue
3
pages
1 - 263
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:25658556
  • wos:000367383300016
  • scopus:84932127272
ISSN
1469-0691
DOI
10.1016/j.cmi.2014.08.020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0f1b8c78-b4b2-4f6f-aff3-82ad5511cea5 (old id 5145267)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25658556?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-03-11 17:38:51
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:08:15
@article{0f1b8c78-b4b2-4f6f-aff3-82ad5511cea5,
  abstract     = {Sore throat is common in primary healthcare. Aetiological studies have focused on the presence of a limited number of pathogens. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of a wide range of bacteria and viruses, including Fusobacterium necrophorum, in patients with pharyngotonsillitis and in asymptomatic controls. A prospective case control study was performed in primary healthcare in Kronoberg County, Sweden. Patients (n=220) aged 15 to 45 years with a suspected acute pharyngotonsillitis, and controls (n=128), were included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed for β-hemolytic streptococci, F. necrophorum, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and 13 respiratory viruses. Serum samples were analysed for antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. The patient history and symptoms, including Centor score, were analysed in relation to pathogens. In 155/220 (70.5%) of the patients, as compared to 26/128 (20.3%) of the controls (p &lt;0.001), at least one microorganism was found. Group A streptococci, F. necrophorum, and influenza B virus were the three most common findings, and all significantly more common in patients than in controls (p &lt;0.001, p 0.001, and p 0.002, respectively). Patients with F. necrophorum only (n=14) displayed a lower Centor score than patients with Group A streptococcus only (n=46), but a higher score than patients with influenza B, other viruses, or no potential pathogen (Kruskal-Wallis p &lt;0.001). A pathogen was detected in 70% of the patients, displaying a wide range of pathogens contributing to the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis. This study supports F. necrophorum as one of the pathogens to be considered in the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis.},
  author       = {Hedin, Katarina and Bieber, L and Lindh, M and Sundqvist, M},
  issn         = {1469-0691},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1--263},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Clinical Microbiology and Infection},
  title        = {The aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis in adolescents and adults - Fusobacterium necrophorum is commonly found.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmi.2014.08.020},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2015},
}