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Recent infections are associated with decreased risk of rheumatoid arthritis: a population-based case-control study.

Sandberg, Maria LU ; Bengtsson, Camilla; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars and Saevarsdottir, Saedis (2014) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 74(5). p.904-907
Abstract
Objectives Do recent infections affect the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)?



Methods We used the population-based case-control study EIRA (N= 6401) on incident RA and healthy controls, matched for sex, age, calendar period and area of residence. Gastroenteritis, urinary tract infection, genital infection, prostatitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis and pneumonia during the 2 years before inclusion in the study were investigated. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate OR, adjusting for smoking and socioeconomic status.



Results Infections in the gastrointestinal and urogenital tract before clinical onset were associated with a lowered risk of RA: gastroenteritis (OR= 0.71 (95% CI 0.63 to... (More)
Objectives Do recent infections affect the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)?



Methods We used the population-based case-control study EIRA (N= 6401) on incident RA and healthy controls, matched for sex, age, calendar period and area of residence. Gastroenteritis, urinary tract infection, genital infection, prostatitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis and pneumonia during the 2 years before inclusion in the study were investigated. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate OR, adjusting for smoking and socioeconomic status.



Results Infections in the gastrointestinal and urogenital tract before clinical onset were associated with a lowered risk of RA: gastroenteritis (OR= 0.71 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.80)), urinary tract infections (OR= 0.78 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.90)) and genital infections (OR= 0.80 (95% CI 0.64 to 1.00)), while a non-significant association of similar magnitude was observed for the less common prostatitis (OR= 0.64 (95% CI 0.38 to 1.08)). In contrast, no associations were observed for sinusitis, tonsillitis or pneumonia.



Conclusions Gastrointestinal and urogenital infections, but not respiratory infections, are associated with a significantly lowered risk of RA. The results indicate that infections in general do not affect the risk for RA, but that certain infections, hypothetically associated with changes in the gut microbiome, could diminish the risk. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
74
issue
5
pages
904 - 907
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:25656683
  • wos:000352158500023
  • scopus:84926673327
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-206493
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
120ef03b-ffe7-4af9-b368-721322d380b6 (old id 5145322)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25656683?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-03-04 18:25:46
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:28:19
@article{120ef03b-ffe7-4af9-b368-721322d380b6,
  abstract     = {Objectives Do recent infections affect the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods We used the population-based case-control study EIRA (N= 6401) on incident RA and healthy controls, matched for sex, age, calendar period and area of residence. Gastroenteritis, urinary tract infection, genital infection, prostatitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis and pneumonia during the 2 years before inclusion in the study were investigated. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate OR, adjusting for smoking and socioeconomic status. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results Infections in the gastrointestinal and urogenital tract before clinical onset were associated with a lowered risk of RA: gastroenteritis (OR= 0.71 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.80)), urinary tract infections (OR= 0.78 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.90)) and genital infections (OR= 0.80 (95% CI 0.64 to 1.00)), while a non-significant association of similar magnitude was observed for the less common prostatitis (OR= 0.64 (95% CI 0.38 to 1.08)). In contrast, no associations were observed for sinusitis, tonsillitis or pneumonia. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions Gastrointestinal and urogenital infections, but not respiratory infections, are associated with a significantly lowered risk of RA. The results indicate that infections in general do not affect the risk for RA, but that certain infections, hypothetically associated with changes in the gut microbiome, could diminish the risk.},
  author       = {Sandberg, Maria and Bengtsson, Camilla and Klareskog, Lars and Alfredsson, Lars and Saevarsdottir, Saedis},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {904--907},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Recent infections are associated with decreased risk of rheumatoid arthritis: a population-based case-control study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-206493},
  volume       = {74},
  year         = {2014},
}