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BDNF increases associated with constant troponin T levels and may protect against poor cognitive interference control : The SABPA prospective study

Jansen van Vuren, Esmé ; Malan, Leoné ; von Känel, Roland ; Magnusson, Martin LU ; Lammertyn, Leandi and Malan, Nicolaas T (2019) In European Journal of Clinical Investigation
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates brain health and cognition, which can interfere with executive cognitive function. BDNF was implicated with microcirculatory ischemia and may reflect cardiomyocyte injury. We aimed to determine whether prospective changes (%Δ) in BDNF and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) will be associated with executive cognitive function in a bi-ethnic cohort.

DESIGN: A prospective investigation was conducted over a three-year period in a bi-ethnic sex cohort (N=338; aged 20-65 years) from South Africa. Fasting serum samples for BDNF and cTnT were obtained. The STROOP colour-word conflict test (CWT) was applied to assess executive cognitive function at baseline.

RESULTS: In Blacks,... (More)

BACKGROUND: Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates brain health and cognition, which can interfere with executive cognitive function. BDNF was implicated with microcirculatory ischemia and may reflect cardiomyocyte injury. We aimed to determine whether prospective changes (%Δ) in BDNF and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) will be associated with executive cognitive function in a bi-ethnic cohort.

DESIGN: A prospective investigation was conducted over a three-year period in a bi-ethnic sex cohort (N=338; aged 20-65 years) from South Africa. Fasting serum samples for BDNF and cTnT were obtained. The STROOP colour-word conflict test (CWT) was applied to assess executive cognitive function at baseline.

RESULTS: In Blacks, BDNF (p<0.001) increased over the three-year period whilst cTnT did not change. In contrast, in Whites, BDNF and cTnT decreased over three years. In Black men, no change in cTnT was associated with increased ΔBDNF (β=0.25; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.45; p=0.02). In the Black men, constant cTnT levels were inversely associated with executive cognitive function (β= -0.33; 95% CI -0.53 to -0.12; p=0.003). Three year increases in BDNF increased the likelihood for chronic lower cTnT levels at a pre-established cut-point of < 4.2 ng/L [OR=2.35 (1.12 to 4.94), p=0.02]. The above associations were not found in the White sex groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Central neural control mechanisms may have upregulated BDNF in Black men as a way to protect against myocardial stress progression and to possibly improve processes related to cognitive interference control. High-sensitive cTnT levels may act as an early predictor of disturbed neural control mechanisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
in
European Journal of Clinical Investigation
article number
e13116
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:30932178
  • scopus:85064645572
ISSN
0014-2972
DOI
10.1111/eci.13116
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
id
515ee2bb-10fc-4e96-9f74-49a690964bc2
date added to LUP
2019-04-04 11:36:52
date last changed
2019-05-28 03:56:09
@article{515ee2bb-10fc-4e96-9f74-49a690964bc2,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates brain health and cognition, which can interfere with executive cognitive function. BDNF was implicated with microcirculatory ischemia and may reflect cardiomyocyte injury. We aimed to determine whether prospective changes (%Δ) in BDNF and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) will be associated with executive cognitive function in a bi-ethnic cohort.</p><p>DESIGN: A prospective investigation was conducted over a three-year period in a bi-ethnic sex cohort (N=338; aged 20-65 years) from South Africa. Fasting serum samples for BDNF and cTnT were obtained. The STROOP colour-word conflict test (CWT) was applied to assess executive cognitive function at baseline.</p><p>RESULTS: In Blacks, BDNF (p&lt;0.001) increased over the three-year period whilst cTnT did not change. In contrast, in Whites, BDNF and cTnT decreased over three years. In Black men, no change in cTnT was associated with increased ΔBDNF (β=0.25; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.45; p=0.02). In the Black men, constant cTnT levels were inversely associated with executive cognitive function (β= -0.33; 95% CI -0.53 to -0.12; p=0.003). Three year increases in BDNF increased the likelihood for chronic lower cTnT levels at a pre-established cut-point of &lt; 4.2 ng/L [OR=2.35 (1.12 to 4.94), p=0.02]. The above associations were not found in the White sex groups.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Central neural control mechanisms may have upregulated BDNF in Black men as a way to protect against myocardial stress progression and to possibly improve processes related to cognitive interference control. High-sensitive cTnT levels may act as an early predictor of disturbed neural control mechanisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.</p>},
  author       = {Jansen van Vuren, Esmé and Malan, Leoné and von Känel, Roland and Magnusson, Martin and Lammertyn, Leandi and Malan, Nicolaas T},
  issn         = {0014-2972},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Investigation},
  title        = {BDNF increases associated with constant troponin T levels and may protect against poor cognitive interference control : The SABPA prospective study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eci.13116},
  doi          = {10.1111/eci.13116},
  year         = {2019},
}