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Body weight and risk of atrial fibrillation in 7,169 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes; an observational study

Grundvold, Irene; Bodegard, Johan; Nilsson, Peter LU ; Svennblad, Bodil; Johansson, Gunnar; Ostgren, Carl Johan and Sundstrom, Johan (2015) In Cardiovascular Diabetology 14.
Abstract
Background: Obesity, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (AF) are closely associated, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We aimed to explore associations between body mass index (BMI) or weight change with risk of AF in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 7,169 participations with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were stratified according to baseline BMI, and after a second BMI measurement within 18 months, further grouped according to relative weight change as "weight gain" (> 1 BMI unit), " stable weight" (+/- 1 BMI unit) and " weight loss" (< 1 BMI unit). The mean follow-up period was 4.6 years, and the risk of AF was estimated using adjusted Cox regression models. Results: Average age at... (More)
Background: Obesity, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (AF) are closely associated, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We aimed to explore associations between body mass index (BMI) or weight change with risk of AF in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 7,169 participations with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were stratified according to baseline BMI, and after a second BMI measurement within 18 months, further grouped according to relative weight change as "weight gain" (> 1 BMI unit), " stable weight" (+/- 1 BMI unit) and " weight loss" (< 1 BMI unit). The mean follow-up period was 4.6 years, and the risk of AF was estimated using adjusted Cox regression models. Results: Average age at diabetes diagnosis was 60 years and the patients were slightly obese (mean BMI 30.2 kg/m(2)). During follow-up, 287 patients developed incident AF, and those with overweight or obesity at baseline had 1.9 fold and 2.9-fold higher risk of AF, respectively, than those with normal BMI. The 14% of the patients with subsequent weight gain had 1.5-fold risk of AF compared with those with stable weight or weight loss. Conclusions: In patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, baseline overweight and obesity, as well as modest weight increase during the first 18 months after diagnosis, were associated with a substantially increased risk of incident AF. Patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from efforts to prevent weight gain in order to reduce the risk of incident AF. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Epidemiology, Atrial fibrillation, Type 2 diabetes, Weight control
in
Cardiovascular Diabetology
volume
14
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000348545000001
  • scopus:84924341821
ISSN
1475-2840
DOI
10.1186/s12933-014-0170-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3eae18ef-84bd-4784-8e13-4ff4f2e92a0f (old id 5201264)
date added to LUP
2015-04-01 07:37:16
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:00:38
@article{3eae18ef-84bd-4784-8e13-4ff4f2e92a0f,
  abstract     = {Background: Obesity, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (AF) are closely associated, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We aimed to explore associations between body mass index (BMI) or weight change with risk of AF in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 7,169 participations with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were stratified according to baseline BMI, and after a second BMI measurement within 18 months, further grouped according to relative weight change as "weight gain" (&gt; 1 BMI unit), " stable weight" (+/- 1 BMI unit) and " weight loss" (&lt; 1 BMI unit). The mean follow-up period was 4.6 years, and the risk of AF was estimated using adjusted Cox regression models. Results: Average age at diabetes diagnosis was 60 years and the patients were slightly obese (mean BMI 30.2 kg/m(2)). During follow-up, 287 patients developed incident AF, and those with overweight or obesity at baseline had 1.9 fold and 2.9-fold higher risk of AF, respectively, than those with normal BMI. The 14% of the patients with subsequent weight gain had 1.5-fold risk of AF compared with those with stable weight or weight loss. Conclusions: In patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, baseline overweight and obesity, as well as modest weight increase during the first 18 months after diagnosis, were associated with a substantially increased risk of incident AF. Patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from efforts to prevent weight gain in order to reduce the risk of incident AF.},
  articleno    = {5},
  author       = {Grundvold, Irene and Bodegard, Johan and Nilsson, Peter and Svennblad, Bodil and Johansson, Gunnar and Ostgren, Carl Johan and Sundstrom, Johan},
  issn         = {1475-2840},
  keyword      = {Epidemiology,Atrial fibrillation,Type 2 diabetes,Weight control},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Cardiovascular Diabetology},
  title        = {Body weight and risk of atrial fibrillation in 7,169 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes; an observational study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12933-014-0170-3},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2015},
}