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Temperature sensitivity of willow dwarf shrub growth from two distinct High Arctic sites

Buchwal, Agata ; Weijers, Stef ; Blok, Daan LU and Elberling, Bo (2018) In International Journal of Biometeorology
Abstract

The High Arctic region has experienced marked climate fluctuations within the past decades strongly affecting tundra shrub growth. However, the spatial variability in dwarf shrub growth responses in this remote region remains largely unknown. This study characterizes temperature sensitivity of radial growth of two willow dwarf shrub species from two distinct High Arctic sites. The dwarf shrub Salix arctica from Northern Greenland (82°N), which has a dry continental High Arctic climate, is linked with Salix polaris from central Svalbard (78° N), which experiences a more oceanic High Arctic climate with relatively mild winters. We found similar positive and significant relationships between annual growth of both Salix dwarf shrub species... (More)

The High Arctic region has experienced marked climate fluctuations within the past decades strongly affecting tundra shrub growth. However, the spatial variability in dwarf shrub growth responses in this remote region remains largely unknown. This study characterizes temperature sensitivity of radial growth of two willow dwarf shrub species from two distinct High Arctic sites. The dwarf shrub Salix arctica from Northern Greenland (82°N), which has a dry continental High Arctic climate, is linked with Salix polaris from central Svalbard (78° N), which experiences a more oceanic High Arctic climate with relatively mild winters. We found similar positive and significant relationships between annual growth of both Salix dwarf shrub species and July–August air temperatures (1960–2010), despite different temperature regimes and shrub growth rates at the two sites. Also, Salix dwarf shrub growth was significantly negatively correlated with Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillation (AO/NAO) indices; S. arctica from Northern Greenland was negatively correlated with previous autumn (AO index) and current summer AO and NAO indices, and S. polaris with the summer NAO index. The results highlight the importance of both local and regional climatic drivers for dwarf willow shrub growth in harsh polar desert habitats and are a step in the direction of identifying and scaling changes in plant growth across the High Arctic.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
AO/NAO index, Climate sensitivity, Greenland, Salix arctica (Pall.), Salix polaris (Wahlenb.), Svalbard
in
International Journal of Biometeorology
pages
15 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85058003355
  • pmid:30511167
ISSN
0020-7128
DOI
10.1007/s00484-018-1648-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
52327c78-aa2e-499e-8fcb-616efdf72c44
date added to LUP
2018-12-21 09:44:15
date last changed
2020-01-13 01:18:32
@article{52327c78-aa2e-499e-8fcb-616efdf72c44,
  abstract     = {<p>The High Arctic region has experienced marked climate fluctuations within the past decades strongly affecting tundra shrub growth. However, the spatial variability in dwarf shrub growth responses in this remote region remains largely unknown. This study characterizes temperature sensitivity of radial growth of two willow dwarf shrub species from two distinct High Arctic sites. The dwarf shrub Salix arctica from Northern Greenland (82°N), which has a dry continental High Arctic climate, is linked with Salix polaris from central Svalbard (78° N), which experiences a more oceanic High Arctic climate with relatively mild winters. We found similar positive and significant relationships between annual growth of both Salix dwarf shrub species and July–August air temperatures (1960–2010), despite different temperature regimes and shrub growth rates at the two sites. Also, Salix dwarf shrub growth was significantly negatively correlated with Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillation (AO/NAO) indices; S. arctica from Northern Greenland was negatively correlated with previous autumn (AO index) and current summer AO and NAO indices, and S. polaris with the summer NAO index. The results highlight the importance of both local and regional climatic drivers for dwarf willow shrub growth in harsh polar desert habitats and are a step in the direction of identifying and scaling changes in plant growth across the High Arctic.</p>},
  author       = {Buchwal, Agata and Weijers, Stef and Blok, Daan and Elberling, Bo},
  issn         = {0020-7128},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Journal of Biometeorology},
  title        = {Temperature sensitivity of willow dwarf shrub growth from two distinct High Arctic sites},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00484-018-1648-6},
  doi          = {10.1007/s00484-018-1648-6},
  year         = {2018},
}