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Classification, epidemiology and clinical subgrouping of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis.

Watts, Richard A; Mahr, Alfred; Mohammad, Aladdin LU ; Gatenby, Paul; Basu, Neil and Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe (2015) In Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 30(suppl 1). p.14-22
Abstract
It is now 25 years since the first European studies on vasculitis-the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) standardization project. Over that period of time, there have been major developments in the classification of the vasculitides, which has permitted the conduct of high-quality epidemiology studies. Studying the epidemiology of rare diseases such as the ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) poses considerable challenges to epidemiologists. The first is the need for a clear definition of a case with good differentiation from similar disorders. The second is case capture. The vasculitides are rare, and therefore, a large population is required to determine the incidence and prevalence, and this poses questions of feasibility. A... (More)
It is now 25 years since the first European studies on vasculitis-the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) standardization project. Over that period of time, there have been major developments in the classification of the vasculitides, which has permitted the conduct of high-quality epidemiology studies. Studying the epidemiology of rare diseases such as the ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) poses considerable challenges to epidemiologists. The first is the need for a clear definition of a case with good differentiation from similar disorders. The second is case capture. The vasculitides are rare, and therefore, a large population is required to determine the incidence and prevalence, and this poses questions of feasibility. A large population increases the risk of incomplete case detection but permits a reasonable number of cases to be collected in a practicable time frame, whereas a smaller population requires a much longer time frame to collect the necessary cases, which may also not be feasible. Statistical methods of capture-recapture analysis enable estimates to be made of the number of missing cases. The third is case ascertainment. The AAV are virtually always managed in secondary care, and therefore, hospital-based case ascertainment may be appropriate. Fourthly, the rarity of the conditions makes prospective case-control studies investigating risk factors difficult to conduct because the population size required to achieve statistical confidence is in excess of that which is readily available. Thus, much of the data on risk factors are derived from retrospective studies with inherent potential bias. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation
volume
30
issue
suppl 1
pages
14 - 22
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25805746
  • wos:000353500300004
  • scopus:84926615364
ISSN
1460-2385
DOI
10.1093/ndt/gfv022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9f2d0747-e99e-42e5-b5bb-b2454c032b9a (old id 5257671)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25805746?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-04-04 17:56:52
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:12:16
@article{9f2d0747-e99e-42e5-b5bb-b2454c032b9a,
  abstract     = {It is now 25 years since the first European studies on vasculitis-the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) standardization project. Over that period of time, there have been major developments in the classification of the vasculitides, which has permitted the conduct of high-quality epidemiology studies. Studying the epidemiology of rare diseases such as the ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) poses considerable challenges to epidemiologists. The first is the need for a clear definition of a case with good differentiation from similar disorders. The second is case capture. The vasculitides are rare, and therefore, a large population is required to determine the incidence and prevalence, and this poses questions of feasibility. A large population increases the risk of incomplete case detection but permits a reasonable number of cases to be collected in a practicable time frame, whereas a smaller population requires a much longer time frame to collect the necessary cases, which may also not be feasible. Statistical methods of capture-recapture analysis enable estimates to be made of the number of missing cases. The third is case ascertainment. The AAV are virtually always managed in secondary care, and therefore, hospital-based case ascertainment may be appropriate. Fourthly, the rarity of the conditions makes prospective case-control studies investigating risk factors difficult to conduct because the population size required to achieve statistical confidence is in excess of that which is readily available. Thus, much of the data on risk factors are derived from retrospective studies with inherent potential bias.},
  author       = {Watts, Richard A and Mahr, Alfred and Mohammad, Aladdin and Gatenby, Paul and Basu, Neil and Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe},
  issn         = {1460-2385},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {suppl 1},
  pages        = {14--22},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation},
  title        = {Classification, epidemiology and clinical subgrouping of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfv022},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2015},
}