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Timelapse ultrasonic tomography for measuring damage localization in geomechanics laboratory tests.

Tudisco, Erika LU ; Roux, Philippe; Hall, Stephen LU ; Viggiani, Giulia M.B and Viggiani, Gioacchino (2015) In Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 137(3). p.1389-1400
Abstract
Variation of mechanical properties in materials can be detected non-destructively using ultrasonic measurements. In particular, changes in elastic wave velocity can occur due to damage, i.e., micro-cracking and particles debonding. Here the challenge of characterizing damage in geomaterials, i.e., rocks and soils, is addressed. Geomaterials are naturally heterogeneous media in which the deformation can localize, so that few measurements of acoustic velocity across the sample are not sufficient to capture the heterogeneities. Therefore, an ultrasonic tomography procedure has been implemented to map the spatial and temporal variations in propagation velocity, which provides information on the damage process. Moreover, double beamforming has... (More)
Variation of mechanical properties in materials can be detected non-destructively using ultrasonic measurements. In particular, changes in elastic wave velocity can occur due to damage, i.e., micro-cracking and particles debonding. Here the challenge of characterizing damage in geomaterials, i.e., rocks and soils, is addressed. Geomaterials are naturally heterogeneous media in which the deformation can localize, so that few measurements of acoustic velocity across the sample are not sufficient to capture the heterogeneities. Therefore, an ultrasonic tomography procedure has been implemented to map the spatial and temporal variations in propagation velocity, which provides information on the damage process. Moreover, double beamforming has been successfully applied to identify and isolate multiple arrivals that are caused by strong heterogeneities (natural or induced by the deformation process). The applicability of the developed experimental technique to laboratory geomechanics testing is illustrated using data acquired on a sample of natural rock before and after being deformed under triaxial compression. The approach is then validated and extended to time-lapse monitoring using data acquired during plane strain compression of a sample including a well defined layer with different mechanical properties than the matrix. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Velocity measurement, Mechanical properties, Ultrasonic Tomography, Ultrasonic velocity
in
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
volume
137
issue
3
pages
1389 - 1400
publisher
American Institute of Physics
external identifiers
  • pmid:25786951
  • wos:000351581800032
  • scopus:84925264406
ISSN
1520-8524
DOI
10.1121/1.4913525
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eda024f7-377a-4846-8a07-d1926749da8a (old id 5258185)
date added to LUP
2015-07-09 11:44:52
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:41:13
@article{eda024f7-377a-4846-8a07-d1926749da8a,
  abstract     = {Variation of mechanical properties in materials can be detected non-destructively using ultrasonic measurements. In particular, changes in elastic wave velocity can occur due to damage, i.e., micro-cracking and particles debonding. Here the challenge of characterizing damage in geomaterials, i.e., rocks and soils, is addressed. Geomaterials are naturally heterogeneous media in which the deformation can localize, so that few measurements of acoustic velocity across the sample are not sufficient to capture the heterogeneities. Therefore, an ultrasonic tomography procedure has been implemented to map the spatial and temporal variations in propagation velocity, which provides information on the damage process. Moreover, double beamforming has been successfully applied to identify and isolate multiple arrivals that are caused by strong heterogeneities (natural or induced by the deformation process). The applicability of the developed experimental technique to laboratory geomechanics testing is illustrated using data acquired on a sample of natural rock before and after being deformed under triaxial compression. The approach is then validated and extended to time-lapse monitoring using data acquired during plane strain compression of a sample including a well defined layer with different mechanical properties than the matrix.},
  author       = {Tudisco, Erika and Roux, Philippe and Hall, Stephen and Viggiani, Giulia M.B and Viggiani, Gioacchino},
  issn         = {1520-8524},
  keyword      = {Velocity measurement,Mechanical properties,Ultrasonic Tomography,Ultrasonic velocity},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1389--1400},
  publisher    = {American Institute of Physics},
  series       = {Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  title        = {Timelapse ultrasonic tomography for measuring damage localization in geomechanics laboratory tests.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4913525},
  volume       = {137},
  year         = {2015},
}