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Preservatives in cosmetics in the Israeli market conform well to the EU legislation

Horev, L.; Isaksson, Marléne LU ; Engfeldt, Malin LU ; Persson, Lena LU ; Ingber, A. and Bruze, Magnus LU (2015) In Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 29(4). p.761-766
Abstract
BackgroundPreservatives are important and frequent skin sensitizers, found in a wide range of products for personal and occupational use. According to the European legislation, some cosmetic ingredients are restricted in terms of quantity and a detailed list of ingredients must be present on the product or packaging. ObjectivesTo examine the use of preservatives in common cosmetics on the Israeli market. Materials/MethodsSixty different Israeli brand cosmetics, including shampoos, liquid soaps, body creams and hand creams were randomly selected. Ingredient labels were examined. The products were investigated by the chromotropic acid method for release of formaldehyde and by high performance liquid chromatography for the presence of... (More)
BackgroundPreservatives are important and frequent skin sensitizers, found in a wide range of products for personal and occupational use. According to the European legislation, some cosmetic ingredients are restricted in terms of quantity and a detailed list of ingredients must be present on the product or packaging. ObjectivesTo examine the use of preservatives in common cosmetics on the Israeli market. Materials/MethodsSixty different Israeli brand cosmetics, including shampoos, liquid soaps, body creams and hand creams were randomly selected. Ingredient labels were examined. The products were investigated by the chromotropic acid method for release of formaldehyde and by high performance liquid chromatography for the presence of formaldehyde, DMDM hydantoin and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI) and MI content. ResultsAll products but one contained a detailed list of ingredients printed on the package. According to labelling, the most prevalent preservatives in Israeli shampoos and liquid soaps were DMDM hydantoin and MCI/MI. Hand creams and body creams contained mainly parabens but also iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, phenoxyethanol and DMDM hydantoin. Formaldehyde in doses from 4 to 429ppm, and DMDM hydantoin were detected in 38 and 16 (63% and 27%) of the products, respectively. MCI/MI was detected in 11 (18%) of the products, with highest prevalence in rinse- off products (55%). Excluding one hand cream which measured 106ppm MI, the amount of formaldehyde, DMDM hydantoin, MCI/MI and MI was within the allowed concentrations by the European directive in all cases. ConclusionsIn Israel, adaptation of the European directive prevails, as shown by the measurements we performed on randomly selected products. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
volume
29
issue
4
pages
761 - 766
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000351684500020
  • scopus:84925381885
ISSN
1468-3083
DOI
10.1111/jdv.12676
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
27a4d612-1780-4899-a1d4-e332fe4944d0 (old id 5277829)
date added to LUP
2015-05-04 08:57:13
date last changed
2017-09-17 03:25:54
@article{27a4d612-1780-4899-a1d4-e332fe4944d0,
  abstract     = {BackgroundPreservatives are important and frequent skin sensitizers, found in a wide range of products for personal and occupational use. According to the European legislation, some cosmetic ingredients are restricted in terms of quantity and a detailed list of ingredients must be present on the product or packaging. ObjectivesTo examine the use of preservatives in common cosmetics on the Israeli market. Materials/MethodsSixty different Israeli brand cosmetics, including shampoos, liquid soaps, body creams and hand creams were randomly selected. Ingredient labels were examined. The products were investigated by the chromotropic acid method for release of formaldehyde and by high performance liquid chromatography for the presence of formaldehyde, DMDM hydantoin and methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI) and MI content. ResultsAll products but one contained a detailed list of ingredients printed on the package. According to labelling, the most prevalent preservatives in Israeli shampoos and liquid soaps were DMDM hydantoin and MCI/MI. Hand creams and body creams contained mainly parabens but also iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, phenoxyethanol and DMDM hydantoin. Formaldehyde in doses from 4 to 429ppm, and DMDM hydantoin were detected in 38 and 16 (63% and 27%) of the products, respectively. MCI/MI was detected in 11 (18%) of the products, with highest prevalence in rinse- off products (55%). Excluding one hand cream which measured 106ppm MI, the amount of formaldehyde, DMDM hydantoin, MCI/MI and MI was within the allowed concentrations by the European directive in all cases. ConclusionsIn Israel, adaptation of the European directive prevails, as shown by the measurements we performed on randomly selected products.},
  author       = {Horev, L. and Isaksson, Marléne and Engfeldt, Malin and Persson, Lena and Ingber, A. and Bruze, Magnus},
  issn         = {1468-3083},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {761--766},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology},
  title        = {Preservatives in cosmetics in the Israeli market conform well to the EU legislation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jdv.12676},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2015},
}