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Decreased postural control in adolescents born with extremely low birth weight

Petersen, Hannes; Tulinius, Arnar-Thor; Georgsdottir, Ingibjorg; Einarsson, Einar-Jon; Patel, Mitesh LU ; Haraldsson, Asgeir and Fransson, Per-Anders LU (2015) In Experimental Brain Research 233(5). p.1651-1662
Abstract
The survival rates of infants born preterm with extremely low birth weight (ELBW a parts per thousand currency sign 1000 g) have gradually improved over the last decades. However, these infants risk to sustain long-term disorders related to poor neurodevelopment. The objective was to determine whether adolescents born with ELBW have decreased postural control and stability adaptation. Twenty-nine ELBW subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing by repeated calf vibration. Their results were compared with twenty-one age- and gender-matched controls born after full-term pregnancy. The ELBW group had significantly decreased stability compared with controls in anteroposterior direction,... (More)
The survival rates of infants born preterm with extremely low birth weight (ELBW a parts per thousand currency sign 1000 g) have gradually improved over the last decades. However, these infants risk to sustain long-term disorders related to poor neurodevelopment. The objective was to determine whether adolescents born with ELBW have decreased postural control and stability adaptation. Twenty-nine ELBW subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing by repeated calf vibration. Their results were compared with twenty-one age- and gender-matched controls born after full-term pregnancy. The ELBW group had significantly decreased stability compared with controls in anteroposterior direction, both during the easier quiet stance posturography (p = 0.007) and during balance perturbations (p = 0.007). The ELBW group had similar stability decrease in lateral direction during balance perturbations (p = 0.013). Statistically, the stability decreases were similar with eyes closed and open, but proportionally larger with eyes open in both directions. Both groups manifested significant adaptation (p a parts per thousand currency sign 0.023) to the balance perturbations in anteroposterior direction, though this adaptation process could not compensate for the general stability deficits caused by ELBW on postural control. Hence, adolescent survivors of ELBW commonly suffer long-term deficits in postural control, manifested as use of substantially more recorded energy on performing stability regulating high-frequency movements and declined stability with closed and open eyes both in anteroposterior and lateral direction. The determined relationship between premature birth and long-term functional deficits advocates that interventions should be developed to provide preventive care in neonatal care units and later on in life. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Low birth weight, Postural control, Childhood, Adaptation, Vision
in
Experimental Brain Research
volume
233
issue
5
pages
1651 - 1662
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000351515800029
  • scopus:84925536618
ISSN
0014-4819
DOI
10.1007/s00221-015-4239-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
80c9d388-f39e-41e0-9f85-6628120b3e97 (old id 5281787)
date added to LUP
2015-05-04 08:55:01
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:32:32
@article{80c9d388-f39e-41e0-9f85-6628120b3e97,
  abstract     = {The survival rates of infants born preterm with extremely low birth weight (ELBW a parts per thousand currency sign 1000 g) have gradually improved over the last decades. However, these infants risk to sustain long-term disorders related to poor neurodevelopment. The objective was to determine whether adolescents born with ELBW have decreased postural control and stability adaptation. Twenty-nine ELBW subjects performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing by repeated calf vibration. Their results were compared with twenty-one age- and gender-matched controls born after full-term pregnancy. The ELBW group had significantly decreased stability compared with controls in anteroposterior direction, both during the easier quiet stance posturography (p = 0.007) and during balance perturbations (p = 0.007). The ELBW group had similar stability decrease in lateral direction during balance perturbations (p = 0.013). Statistically, the stability decreases were similar with eyes closed and open, but proportionally larger with eyes open in both directions. Both groups manifested significant adaptation (p a parts per thousand currency sign 0.023) to the balance perturbations in anteroposterior direction, though this adaptation process could not compensate for the general stability deficits caused by ELBW on postural control. Hence, adolescent survivors of ELBW commonly suffer long-term deficits in postural control, manifested as use of substantially more recorded energy on performing stability regulating high-frequency movements and declined stability with closed and open eyes both in anteroposterior and lateral direction. The determined relationship between premature birth and long-term functional deficits advocates that interventions should be developed to provide preventive care in neonatal care units and later on in life.},
  author       = {Petersen, Hannes and Tulinius, Arnar-Thor and Georgsdottir, Ingibjorg and Einarsson, Einar-Jon and Patel, Mitesh and Haraldsson, Asgeir and Fransson, Per-Anders},
  issn         = {0014-4819},
  keyword      = {Low birth weight,Postural control,Childhood,Adaptation,Vision},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1651--1662},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Experimental Brain Research},
  title        = {Decreased postural control in adolescents born with extremely low birth weight},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-015-4239-3},
  volume       = {233},
  year         = {2015},
}