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Kinesiophobia and its relation to pain characteristics and cognitive affective variables in older adults with chronic pain

Larsson, Caroline LU ; Ekvall Hansson, Eva LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Jakobsson, Ulf LU (2016) In BMC Geriatrics 16(1).
Abstract

Background: The contribution of kinesiophobia (fear of movement) to the pain experience among older adults has been poorly evaluated. The aim of this study was to study prevalence at baseline, development over a 12-month period and cognitive-affective variables of kinesiophobia in a population-based sample of older adults with chronic pain. Methods: The study included 433 older adults (+65 years) with chronic pain (mean age 74.8 years) randomly selected using a Swedish register of inhabitants. Kinesiophobia was measured at baseline and 12-month follow-up with the 11-item version of the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK-11). Associations of demographic-, cognitive affective - and pain-related variables to kinesiophobia were analysed with... (More)

Background: The contribution of kinesiophobia (fear of movement) to the pain experience among older adults has been poorly evaluated. The aim of this study was to study prevalence at baseline, development over a 12-month period and cognitive-affective variables of kinesiophobia in a population-based sample of older adults with chronic pain. Methods: The study included 433 older adults (+65 years) with chronic pain (mean age 74.8 years) randomly selected using a Swedish register of inhabitants. Kinesiophobia was measured at baseline and 12-month follow-up with the 11-item version of the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK-11). Associations of demographic-, cognitive affective - and pain-related variables to kinesiophobia were analysed with linear regression analyses. Results: The mean level of kinesiophobia was low. Worsening and recovering from kinesiophobia occurred over time, but the mean level of kinesiophobia remained unchanged (p = 0.972). High levels of kinesiophobia (TSK ≥35) were found among frailer and older adults predominately living in care homes, but not dependent on sex. Poor self-perceived health (OR = 8.84) and high pain intensity (OR = 1.22) were significantly associated with kinesiophobia. Conclusion: Results indicate that potential interventions regarding kinesiophobia among older adults should aim to decrease pain intensity and strengthen health beliefs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Chronic pain, Kinesiophobia, Older adults, Prevalence
in
BMC Geriatrics
volume
16
issue
1
external identifiers
  • scopus:84977264556
  • wos:000379253200001
ISSN
1471-2318
DOI
10.1186/s12877-016-0302-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
52adf2f4-78c5-42ee-9fc7-c05780fea350
date added to LUP
2016-07-25 13:09:58
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:31:02
@article{52adf2f4-78c5-42ee-9fc7-c05780fea350,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: The contribution of kinesiophobia (fear of movement) to the pain experience among older adults has been poorly evaluated. The aim of this study was to study prevalence at baseline, development over a 12-month period and cognitive-affective variables of kinesiophobia in a population-based sample of older adults with chronic pain. Methods: The study included 433 older adults (+65 years) with chronic pain (mean age 74.8 years) randomly selected using a Swedish register of inhabitants. Kinesiophobia was measured at baseline and 12-month follow-up with the 11-item version of the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK-11). Associations of demographic-, cognitive affective - and pain-related variables to kinesiophobia were analysed with linear regression analyses. Results: The mean level of kinesiophobia was low. Worsening and recovering from kinesiophobia occurred over time, but the mean level of kinesiophobia remained unchanged (p = 0.972). High levels of kinesiophobia (TSK ≥35) were found among frailer and older adults predominately living in care homes, but not dependent on sex. Poor self-perceived health (OR = 8.84) and high pain intensity (OR = 1.22) were significantly associated with kinesiophobia. Conclusion: Results indicate that potential interventions regarding kinesiophobia among older adults should aim to decrease pain intensity and strengthen health beliefs.</p>},
  articleno    = {128},
  author       = {Larsson, Caroline and Ekvall Hansson, Eva and Sundquist, Kristina and Jakobsson, Ulf},
  issn         = {1471-2318},
  keyword      = {Chronic pain,Kinesiophobia,Older adults,Prevalence},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {1},
  series       = {BMC Geriatrics},
  title        = {Kinesiophobia and its relation to pain characteristics and cognitive affective variables in older adults with chronic pain},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-016-0302-6},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2016},
}