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Changes in pulmonary oxygen content are detectable with laser absorption spectroscopy : proof of concept in newborn piglets

Svanberg, Emilie Krite LU ; Larsson, Jim LU ; Rasmussen, Martin ; Larsson, Marcus LU ; Leander, Dennis ; Bergsten, Sara ; Bood, Joakim LU ; Greisen, Gorm and Fellman, Vineta LU orcid (2021) In Pediatric Research 89(4). p.823-829
Abstract

Background: Using an optical method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, we previously assessed oxygen (O2) and water vapor (H2O) content in a tissue phantom of the preterm infant lung. Here we applied this method on newborn piglets with induced lung complications. Methods: Five mechanically ventilated piglets were subjected to stepwise increased and decreased fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), to atelectasis using a balloon catheter in the right bronchus, and to pneumothorax by injecting air in the pleural cavity. Two diode lasers (764 nm for O2 gas absorption and 820 nm for H2O absorption) were combined in a probe delivering light either externally, on the skin,... (More)

Background: Using an optical method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, we previously assessed oxygen (O2) and water vapor (H2O) content in a tissue phantom of the preterm infant lung. Here we applied this method on newborn piglets with induced lung complications. Methods: Five mechanically ventilated piglets were subjected to stepwise increased and decreased fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), to atelectasis using a balloon catheter in the right bronchus, and to pneumothorax by injecting air in the pleural cavity. Two diode lasers (764 nm for O2 gas absorption and 820 nm for H2O absorption) were combined in a probe delivering light either externally, on the skin, or internally, through the esophagus. The detector probe was placed dermally. Results: Calculated O2 concentrations increased from 20% (IQR 17−23%) when ventilated with room air to 97% (88−108%) at FiO2 1.0. H2O was only detectable with the internal light source. Specific light absorption and transmission patterns were identified in response to atelectasis and pneumothorax, respectively. Conclusions: The optical method detected FiO2 variations and discriminated the two induced lung pathologies, providing a rationale for further development into a minimally invasive device for real-time monitoring gas changes in the lungs of sick newborn infants. Impact: Optical spectroscopy can detect pulmonary complications in an animal model.Oxygen concentrations can be evaluated in the lungs.Presents a novel minimally invasive method to detect lung oxygenation and complications.Potential to be developed into a lung monitoring method in newborn infants.Potential for bed-side detection of pulmonary complications in newborn infants.

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author
; ; ; ; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pediatric Research
volume
89
issue
4
pages
7 pages
publisher
International Pediatric Foundation Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:32534453
  • scopus:85086921687
ISSN
0031-3998
DOI
10.1038/s41390-020-0971-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
53544787-0dc8-4482-b24f-3ad76f707e9f
date added to LUP
2020-07-13 10:47:08
date last changed
2024-04-17 12:01:06
@article{53544787-0dc8-4482-b24f-3ad76f707e9f,
  abstract     = {{<p>Background: Using an optical method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, we previously assessed oxygen (O<sub>2</sub>) and water vapor (H<sub>2</sub>O) content in a tissue phantom of the preterm infant lung. Here we applied this method on newborn piglets with induced lung complications. Methods: Five mechanically ventilated piglets were subjected to stepwise increased and decreased fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO<sub>2</sub>), to atelectasis using a balloon catheter in the right bronchus, and to pneumothorax by injecting air in the pleural cavity. Two diode lasers (764 nm for O<sub>2</sub> gas absorption and 820 nm for H<sub>2</sub>O absorption) were combined in a probe delivering light either externally, on the skin, or internally, through the esophagus. The detector probe was placed dermally. Results: Calculated O<sub>2</sub> concentrations increased from 20% (IQR 17−23%) when ventilated with room air to 97% (88−108%) at FiO<sub>2</sub> 1.0. H<sub>2</sub>O was only detectable with the internal light source. Specific light absorption and transmission patterns were identified in response to atelectasis and pneumothorax, respectively. Conclusions: The optical method detected FiO<sub>2</sub> variations and discriminated the two induced lung pathologies, providing a rationale for further development into a minimally invasive device for real-time monitoring gas changes in the lungs of sick newborn infants. Impact: Optical spectroscopy can detect pulmonary complications in an animal model.Oxygen concentrations can be evaluated in the lungs.Presents a novel minimally invasive method to detect lung oxygenation and complications.Potential to be developed into a lung monitoring method in newborn infants.Potential for bed-side detection of pulmonary complications in newborn infants.</p>}},
  author       = {{Svanberg, Emilie Krite and Larsson, Jim and Rasmussen, Martin and Larsson, Marcus and Leander, Dennis and Bergsten, Sara and Bood, Joakim and Greisen, Gorm and Fellman, Vineta}},
  issn         = {{0031-3998}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  month        = {{03}},
  number       = {{4}},
  pages        = {{823--829}},
  publisher    = {{International Pediatric Foundation Inc.}},
  series       = {{Pediatric Research}},
  title        = {{Changes in pulmonary oxygen content are detectable with laser absorption spectroscopy : proof of concept in newborn piglets}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41390-020-0971-x}},
  doi          = {{10.1038/s41390-020-0971-x}},
  volume       = {{89}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}