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WPS, peace negotiations, and peace agreements

Aggestam, Karin LU (2018) p.815-828
Abstract

Peace negotiations and their outcomes have long-term repercussions for post-conflict politics and societies. Yet, one of the most striking patterns of contemporary peace diplomacy is the gross underrepresentation of women at the negotiation table, which reflects the gendered nature of diplomacy as an institution. The research question raised in this chapter concern how gender impacts peace negotiations, and how women’s participation is conceptualized in theory and framed in policy? The chapter first takes stock of contemporary policy discourses on women’s participation and the state-of-the art of scholarly work on gender and peace negotiations. It then moves on to depict where women are descriptively positioned in peace negotiation and... (More)

Peace negotiations and their outcomes have long-term repercussions for post-conflict politics and societies. Yet, one of the most striking patterns of contemporary peace diplomacy is the gross underrepresentation of women at the negotiation table, which reflects the gendered nature of diplomacy as an institution. The research question raised in this chapter concern how gender impacts peace negotiations, and how women’s participation is conceptualized in theory and framed in policy? The chapter first takes stock of contemporary policy discourses on women’s participation and the state-of-the art of scholarly work on gender and peace negotiations. It then moves on to depict where women are descriptively positioned in peace negotiation and analyzes the gendered dynamics of peace negotiations. It highlights some enabling and constraining factors, which influence women’s participation in peace negotiation. The chapter concludes with a discussion of how a research agenda can be advanced on gender and peace negotiation.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Empirical research, Empirical study, Participation, Peace diplomacy, Peace negotiations
host publication
The Oxford Handbook of Women, Peace, and Security
pages
14 pages
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85061220675
ISBN
9780190638276
DOI
10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190638276.013.12
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
535d6a98-8c0d-40c5-b909-00ec715e1c8c
date added to LUP
2019-02-19 14:40:11
date last changed
2019-04-10 04:20:09
@inbook{535d6a98-8c0d-40c5-b909-00ec715e1c8c,
  abstract     = {<p>Peace negotiations and their outcomes have long-term repercussions for post-conflict politics and societies. Yet, one of the most striking patterns of contemporary peace diplomacy is the gross underrepresentation of women at the negotiation table, which reflects the gendered nature of diplomacy as an institution. The research question raised in this chapter concern how gender impacts peace negotiations, and how women’s participation is conceptualized in theory and framed in policy? The chapter first takes stock of contemporary policy discourses on women’s participation and the state-of-the art of scholarly work on gender and peace negotiations. It then moves on to depict where women are descriptively positioned in peace negotiation and analyzes the gendered dynamics of peace negotiations. It highlights some enabling and constraining factors, which influence women’s participation in peace negotiation. The chapter concludes with a discussion of how a research agenda can be advanced on gender and peace negotiation.</p>},
  author       = {Aggestam, Karin},
  isbn         = {9780190638276},
  keyword      = {Empirical research,Empirical study,Participation,Peace diplomacy,Peace negotiations},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  pages        = {815--828},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  title        = {WPS, peace negotiations, and peace agreements},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190638276.013.12},
  year         = {2018},
}