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TGF-β signaling in the control of hematopoietic stem cells.

Blank Savukinas, Ulrika LU and Karlsson, Stefan LU (2015) In Blood 125(23). p.3542-3550
Abstract
Blood is a tissue with high cellular turnover, and its production is a tightly orchestrated process that requires constant replenishment. All mature blood cells are generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are the self-renewing units that sustain life-long hematopoiesis. HSC behavior, such as self-renewal and quiescence, are regulated by a wide array of factors, including external signaling cues present in the bone marrow. The Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family of cytokines constitutes a multifunctional signaling circuitry, which regulates pivotal functions related to cell fate and behavior in virtually all tissues of the body. In the hematopoietic system, TGF-β signaling controls a wide spectrum of biological... (More)
Blood is a tissue with high cellular turnover, and its production is a tightly orchestrated process that requires constant replenishment. All mature blood cells are generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are the self-renewing units that sustain life-long hematopoiesis. HSC behavior, such as self-renewal and quiescence, are regulated by a wide array of factors, including external signaling cues present in the bone marrow. The Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family of cytokines constitutes a multifunctional signaling circuitry, which regulates pivotal functions related to cell fate and behavior in virtually all tissues of the body. In the hematopoietic system, TGF-β signaling controls a wide spectrum of biological processes, from homeostasis of the immune system to quiescence and self-renewal of HSCs. Here, we review key features and emerging concepts pertaining to TGF-β and downstream signaling pathways in normal HSC biology, featuring aspects of aging, hematological disease, and how this circuitry may be exploited for clinical purposes in the future. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood
volume
125
issue
23
pages
3542 - 3550
publisher
American Society of Hematology
external identifiers
  • pmid:25833962
  • wos:000357281200008
  • scopus:84930933095
ISSN
1528-0020
DOI
10.1182/blood-2014-12-618090
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0f65137c-97c0-4095-ac85-3d5e4bc97197 (old id 5360288)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25833962?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-05-07 18:09:27
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:02:06
@article{0f65137c-97c0-4095-ac85-3d5e4bc97197,
  abstract     = {Blood is a tissue with high cellular turnover, and its production is a tightly orchestrated process that requires constant replenishment. All mature blood cells are generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are the self-renewing units that sustain life-long hematopoiesis. HSC behavior, such as self-renewal and quiescence, are regulated by a wide array of factors, including external signaling cues present in the bone marrow. The Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family of cytokines constitutes a multifunctional signaling circuitry, which regulates pivotal functions related to cell fate and behavior in virtually all tissues of the body. In the hematopoietic system, TGF-β signaling controls a wide spectrum of biological processes, from homeostasis of the immune system to quiescence and self-renewal of HSCs. Here, we review key features and emerging concepts pertaining to TGF-β and downstream signaling pathways in normal HSC biology, featuring aspects of aging, hematological disease, and how this circuitry may be exploited for clinical purposes in the future.},
  author       = {Blank Savukinas, Ulrika and Karlsson, Stefan},
  issn         = {1528-0020},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {23},
  pages        = {3542--3550},
  publisher    = {American Society of Hematology},
  series       = {Blood},
  title        = {TGF-β signaling in the control of hematopoietic stem cells.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2014-12-618090},
  volume       = {125},
  year         = {2015},
}