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Is the tied returnee male or female? The trailing spouse thesis reconsidered

Amcoff, Jan and Niedomysl, Thomas LU (2015) In Population Space and Place 21(8). p.872-881
Abstract (Swedish)
Abstract in Undetermined

A common finding of 30–40 years of family migration studies worldwide is that such migration primarily benefits the careers of men in couples but generally damages the women’s careers. Findings have recently become more nuanced as the research focus has broadened,

hinting that families returning to one spouse’s region of previous residence might deviate from this general observation of men as gainers. The present research demonstrates that when families migrate to regions where one spouse has previously lived, it is the female spouse who tends to return, the male spouse (and children, if any) accompanying her as a trailing spouse. This result also holds when restricting attention to those... (More)
Abstract in Undetermined

A common finding of 30–40 years of family migration studies worldwide is that such migration primarily benefits the careers of men in couples but generally damages the women’s careers. Findings have recently become more nuanced as the research focus has broadened,

hinting that families returning to one spouse’s region of previous residence might deviate from this general observation of men as gainers. The present research demonstrates that when families migrate to regions where one spouse has previously lived, it is the female spouse who tends to return, the male spouse (and children, if any) accompanying her as a trailing spouse. This result also holds when restricting attention to those few families in which the female spouse experiences the greatest income increase by moving. There is no evidence of a tradeoff between returning to a region of previous residence and career development. The findings suggest that women compensate for the slighter economic gains with greater non-monetary gains. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Population Space and Place
volume
21
issue
8
pages
872 - 881
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000364638500014
  • scopus:84946497050
ISSN
1544-8452
DOI
10.1002/psp.1969
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f7b2a3ac-48c4-4a8f-b445-2e407d6d520d (old id 5384791)
date added to LUP
2015-05-13 12:29:29
date last changed
2017-04-16 03:11:40
@article{f7b2a3ac-48c4-4a8f-b445-2e407d6d520d,
  abstract     = {<b>Abstract in Undetermined</b><br/><br>
A common finding of 30–40 years of family migration studies worldwide is that such migration primarily benefits the careers of men in couples but generally damages the women’s careers. Findings have recently become more nuanced as the research focus has broadened,<br/><br>
hinting that families returning to one spouse’s region of previous residence might deviate from this general observation of men as gainers. The present research demonstrates that when families migrate to regions where one spouse has previously lived, it is the female spouse who tends to return, the male spouse (and children, if any) accompanying her as a trailing spouse. This result also holds when restricting attention to those few families in which the female spouse experiences the greatest income increase by moving. There is no evidence of a tradeoff between returning to a region of previous residence and career development. The findings suggest that women compensate for the slighter economic gains with greater non-monetary gains.},
  author       = {Amcoff, Jan and Niedomysl, Thomas},
  issn         = {1544-8452},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {872--881},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Population Space and Place},
  title        = {Is the tied returnee male or female? The trailing spouse thesis reconsidered},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/psp.1969},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2015},
}