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Presbyvestibulopathie : Diagnosekriterien Konsensdokument des Klassifikationskomitees der Bárány-Gesellschaft

Agrawal, Yuri (2020) In Nervenheilkunde 39(4). p.242-250
Abstract

This paper describes the diagnostic criteria for presbyvestibulopathy (PVP) by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society. PVP is defined as a chronic vestibular syndrome characterized by unsteadiness, gait disturbance, and/or recurrent falls in the presence of mild bilateral vestibular deficits, with findings on laboratory tests that are between normal values and thresholds established for bilateral vestibulopathy. The diagnosis of PVP is based on the patient history, bedside examination and laboratory evaluation. The diagnosis of PVP requires bilaterally reduced function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). This can be diagnosed for the high frequency range of the VOR with the video-HIT (vHIT); for the middle frequency range... (More)

This paper describes the diagnostic criteria for presbyvestibulopathy (PVP) by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society. PVP is defined as a chronic vestibular syndrome characterized by unsteadiness, gait disturbance, and/or recurrent falls in the presence of mild bilateral vestibular deficits, with findings on laboratory tests that are between normal values and thresholds established for bilateral vestibulopathy. The diagnosis of PVP is based on the patient history, bedside examination and laboratory evaluation. The diagnosis of PVP requires bilaterally reduced function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). This can be diagnosed for the high frequency range of the VOR with the video-HIT (vHIT); for the middle frequency range with rotary chair testing; and for the low frequency range with caloric testing. For the diagnosis of PVP, the horizontal angular VOR gain on both sides should be < 0.8 and > 0.6, and/or the sum of the maximal peak velocities of the slow phase caloric-induced nystagmus for stimulation with warm and cold water on each side should be < 25°/s and > 6°/s, and/or the horizontal angular VOR gain should be > 0.1 and < 0.3 upon sinusoidal stimulation on a rotatory chair. PVP typically occurs along with other age-related deficits of vision, proprioception, and/or cortical, cerebellar and extrapyramidal function which also contribute and might even be required for the manifestation of the symptoms of unsteadiness, gait disturbance, and falls. These criteria simply consider the presence of these symptoms, along with documented impairment of vestibular function, in older adults.

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author
alternative title
Presbyvestibulopathy
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
diagnostic criteria, dizziness, Presbyvestibulopathy
in
Nervenheilkunde
volume
39
issue
4
pages
9 pages
publisher
Schattauer GmbH
external identifiers
  • scopus:85083090890
ISSN
0722-1541
DOI
10.1055/a-1110-9424
language
German
LU publication?
no
id
538f7dca-e60e-40b3-bd6e-477f9c805496
date added to LUP
2020-05-06 11:20:05
date last changed
2020-10-21 08:08:30
@article{538f7dca-e60e-40b3-bd6e-477f9c805496,
  abstract     = {<p>This paper describes the diagnostic criteria for presbyvestibulopathy (PVP) by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society. PVP is defined as a chronic vestibular syndrome characterized by unsteadiness, gait disturbance, and/or recurrent falls in the presence of mild bilateral vestibular deficits, with findings on laboratory tests that are between normal values and thresholds established for bilateral vestibulopathy. The diagnosis of PVP is based on the patient history, bedside examination and laboratory evaluation. The diagnosis of PVP requires bilaterally reduced function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). This can be diagnosed for the high frequency range of the VOR with the video-HIT (vHIT); for the middle frequency range with rotary chair testing; and for the low frequency range with caloric testing. For the diagnosis of PVP, the horizontal angular VOR gain on both sides should be &lt; 0.8 and &gt; 0.6, and/or the sum of the maximal peak velocities of the slow phase caloric-induced nystagmus for stimulation with warm and cold water on each side should be &lt; 25°/s and &gt; 6°/s, and/or the horizontal angular VOR gain should be &gt; 0.1 and &lt; 0.3 upon sinusoidal stimulation on a rotatory chair. PVP typically occurs along with other age-related deficits of vision, proprioception, and/or cortical, cerebellar and extrapyramidal function which also contribute and might even be required for the manifestation of the symptoms of unsteadiness, gait disturbance, and falls. These criteria simply consider the presence of these symptoms, along with documented impairment of vestibular function, in older adults.</p>},
  author       = {Agrawal, Yuri},
  issn         = {0722-1541},
  language     = {ger},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {242--250},
  publisher    = {Schattauer GmbH},
  series       = {Nervenheilkunde},
  title        = {Presbyvestibulopathie : Diagnosekriterien Konsensdokument des Klassifikationskomitees der Bárány-Gesellschaft},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1110-9424},
  doi          = {10.1055/a-1110-9424},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2020},
}