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Self-fertilization and inbreeding limit the scope for sexually antagonistic polymorphism

Tazzyman, S. J. and Abbott, Jessica LU (2015) In Journal of Evolutionary Biology 28(3). p.723-729
Abstract
Sexual antagonism occurs when there is a positive intersexual genetic correlation in trait expression but opposite fitness effects of the trait(s) in males and females. As such, it constrains the evolution of sexual dimorphism and may therefore have implications for adaptive evolution. There is currently considerable evidence for the existence of sexually antagonistic genetic variation in laboratory and natural populations, but how sexual antagonism interacts with other evolutionary phenomena is still poorly understood in many cases. Here, we explore how self-fertilization and inbreeding affect the maintenance of polymorphism for sexually antagonistic loci. We expected a priori that selfing should reduce the region of polymorphism, as... (More)
Sexual antagonism occurs when there is a positive intersexual genetic correlation in trait expression but opposite fitness effects of the trait(s) in males and females. As such, it constrains the evolution of sexual dimorphism and may therefore have implications for adaptive evolution. There is currently considerable evidence for the existence of sexually antagonistic genetic variation in laboratory and natural populations, but how sexual antagonism interacts with other evolutionary phenomena is still poorly understood in many cases. Here, we explore how self-fertilization and inbreeding affect the maintenance of polymorphism for sexually antagonistic loci. We expected a priori that selfing should reduce the region of polymorphism, as inbreeding reduces the frequency of heterozygotes and speeds fixation. This expectation was supported, but although previous results suggest that the more an allele that is deleterious to one sex is dominant in that sex, the smaller the region of parameter space that will admit polymorphism, we found that this effect is weakened by self-fertilization. However, the effect of inbreeding is not strong enough to completely cancel out the effect of dominance: For a given frequency of inbreeding, it will still be the case that the more dominant the alleles are in their deleterious context, the smaller the region of parameter space in which they can exist at polymorphism. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hermaphrodites, inbreeding, intralocus sexual conflict, population, genetics, sexual antagonism
in
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
volume
28
issue
3
pages
723 - 729
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000352628400018
  • scopus:84926259094
ISSN
1420-9101
DOI
10.1111/jeb.12592
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
09516c6c-49c3-4d7a-be91-1bc5fb955628 (old id 5403074)
date added to LUP
2015-05-18 13:50:15
date last changed
2017-02-19 03:05:28
@article{09516c6c-49c3-4d7a-be91-1bc5fb955628,
  abstract     = {Sexual antagonism occurs when there is a positive intersexual genetic correlation in trait expression but opposite fitness effects of the trait(s) in males and females. As such, it constrains the evolution of sexual dimorphism and may therefore have implications for adaptive evolution. There is currently considerable evidence for the existence of sexually antagonistic genetic variation in laboratory and natural populations, but how sexual antagonism interacts with other evolutionary phenomena is still poorly understood in many cases. Here, we explore how self-fertilization and inbreeding affect the maintenance of polymorphism for sexually antagonistic loci. We expected a priori that selfing should reduce the region of polymorphism, as inbreeding reduces the frequency of heterozygotes and speeds fixation. This expectation was supported, but although previous results suggest that the more an allele that is deleterious to one sex is dominant in that sex, the smaller the region of parameter space that will admit polymorphism, we found that this effect is weakened by self-fertilization. However, the effect of inbreeding is not strong enough to completely cancel out the effect of dominance: For a given frequency of inbreeding, it will still be the case that the more dominant the alleles are in their deleterious context, the smaller the region of parameter space in which they can exist at polymorphism.},
  author       = {Tazzyman, S. J. and Abbott, Jessica},
  issn         = {1420-9101},
  keyword      = {hermaphrodites,inbreeding,intralocus sexual conflict,population,genetics,sexual antagonism},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {723--729},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  title        = {Self-fertilization and inbreeding limit the scope for sexually antagonistic polymorphism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12592},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2015},
}