Advanced

Detecting transmission areas of malaria parasites in a migratory bird species.

Garcia-Longoria, Luz; Hellgren, Olof LU ; Bensch, Staffan LU ; DE Lope, Florentino and Marzal, Alfonso (2015) In Parasitology 142(9). p.1215-1220
Abstract
The identification of the regions where vector-borne diseases are transmitted is essential to study transmission patterns and to recognize future changes in environmental conditions that may potentially influence the transmission areas. SGS1, one of the lineages of Plasmodium relictum, is known to have active transmission in tropical Africa and temperate regions of Europe. Nuclear sequence data from isolates infected with SGS1 (based on merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) allelic diversity) have provided new insights on the distribution and transmission areas of these allelic variants. For example, MSP1 alleles transmitted in Africa differ from those transmitted in Europe, suggesting the existence of two populations of SGS1 lineages.... (More)
The identification of the regions where vector-borne diseases are transmitted is essential to study transmission patterns and to recognize future changes in environmental conditions that may potentially influence the transmission areas. SGS1, one of the lineages of Plasmodium relictum, is known to have active transmission in tropical Africa and temperate regions of Europe. Nuclear sequence data from isolates infected with SGS1 (based on merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) allelic diversity) have provided new insights on the distribution and transmission areas of these allelic variants. For example, MSP1 alleles transmitted in Africa differ from those transmitted in Europe, suggesting the existence of two populations of SGS1 lineages. However, no study has analysed the distribution of African and European transmitted alleles in Afro-Palearctic migratory birds. With this aim, we used a highly variable molecular marker to investigate whether juvenile house martins become infected in Europe before their first migration to Africa. We explored the MSP1 allelic diversity of P. relictum in adult and juvenile house martins. We found that juveniles were infected with SGS1 during their first weeks of life, confirming active transmission of SGS1 to house martins in Europe. Moreover, we found that all the juveniles and most of adults were infected with one European transmitted MSP1 allele, whereas two adult birds were infected with two African transmitted MSP1 alleles. These findings suggest that house martins are exposed to different strains of P. relictum in their winter and breeding quarters. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Parasitology
volume
142
issue
9
pages
1215 - 1220
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25968571
  • wos:000357739700009
  • scopus:84937072866
ISSN
1469-8161
DOI
10.1017/S0031182015000487
project
Malaria in birds
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
447a11f5-b192-433c-89a6-7aaab76e54af (old id 5453314)
date added to LUP
2015-06-16 14:57:31
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:29:16
@article{447a11f5-b192-433c-89a6-7aaab76e54af,
  abstract     = {The identification of the regions where vector-borne diseases are transmitted is essential to study transmission patterns and to recognize future changes in environmental conditions that may potentially influence the transmission areas. SGS1, one of the lineages of Plasmodium relictum, is known to have active transmission in tropical Africa and temperate regions of Europe. Nuclear sequence data from isolates infected with SGS1 (based on merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) allelic diversity) have provided new insights on the distribution and transmission areas of these allelic variants. For example, MSP1 alleles transmitted in Africa differ from those transmitted in Europe, suggesting the existence of two populations of SGS1 lineages. However, no study has analysed the distribution of African and European transmitted alleles in Afro-Palearctic migratory birds. With this aim, we used a highly variable molecular marker to investigate whether juvenile house martins become infected in Europe before their first migration to Africa. We explored the MSP1 allelic diversity of P. relictum in adult and juvenile house martins. We found that juveniles were infected with SGS1 during their first weeks of life, confirming active transmission of SGS1 to house martins in Europe. Moreover, we found that all the juveniles and most of adults were infected with one European transmitted MSP1 allele, whereas two adult birds were infected with two African transmitted MSP1 alleles. These findings suggest that house martins are exposed to different strains of P. relictum in their winter and breeding quarters.},
  author       = {Garcia-Longoria, Luz and Hellgren, Olof and Bensch, Staffan and DE Lope, Florentino and Marzal, Alfonso},
  issn         = {1469-8161},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1215--1220},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Parasitology},
  title        = {Detecting transmission areas of malaria parasites in a migratory bird species.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0031182015000487},
  volume       = {142},
  year         = {2015},
}