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Primary cilia mechanics affects cell mechanosensation: A computational study.

Khayyeri, Hanifeh LU ; Barreto, Sara and Lacroix, Damien (2015) In Journal of Theoretical Biology 379. p.38-46
Abstract
Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow... (More)
Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow chamber. Fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed by simulating perfusion flow of 1mm/s on the cell model. Simulations of cells with different PC mechanical characteristics, showed that the length and the stiffness of PC are responsible for the transmission of mechanical stimuli to the cytoskeleton. Fluid flow deflects the cilium, with the highest strains found at the base of the PC and in the cytoplasm. The PC deflection created further strains on the cell nucleus but did not influence microtubules and actin bundles significantly. Our results indicate that PC deflection under fluid flow stimulation transmits mechanical strain primarily to other essential organelles in the cytoplasm, such as the Golgi complex, that regulate cells' mechanoresponse. The simulations further suggest that cell mechanosensitivity can be altered by targeting PC length and rigidity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Theoretical Biology
volume
379
pages
38 - 46
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:25956361
  • wos:000356839700005
  • scopus:84929645900
ISSN
1095-8541
DOI
10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.04.034
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4e8970df-b36b-4fb0-a2e7-ac3e57282581 (old id 5453706)
date added to LUP
2015-06-16 12:12:43
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:21:44
@article{4e8970df-b36b-4fb0-a2e7-ac3e57282581,
  abstract     = {Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow chamber. Fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed by simulating perfusion flow of 1mm/s on the cell model. Simulations of cells with different PC mechanical characteristics, showed that the length and the stiffness of PC are responsible for the transmission of mechanical stimuli to the cytoskeleton. Fluid flow deflects the cilium, with the highest strains found at the base of the PC and in the cytoplasm. The PC deflection created further strains on the cell nucleus but did not influence microtubules and actin bundles significantly. Our results indicate that PC deflection under fluid flow stimulation transmits mechanical strain primarily to other essential organelles in the cytoplasm, such as the Golgi complex, that regulate cells' mechanoresponse. The simulations further suggest that cell mechanosensitivity can be altered by targeting PC length and rigidity.},
  author       = {Khayyeri, Hanifeh and Barreto, Sara and Lacroix, Damien},
  issn         = {1095-8541},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {38--46},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Journal of Theoretical Biology},
  title        = {Primary cilia mechanics affects cell mechanosensation: A computational study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2015.04.034},
  volume       = {379},
  year         = {2015},
}