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What's on the top? Household load patterns and peak load problems

Sernhed, Kerstin LU (2006) Energy Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting (EEDAL) In [Host publication title missing]
Abstract
Most energy behaviour studies on households focus on the questions how and why we use energy and what can be done to lower energy consumption. Very few studies raise the question of when energy is used or examine the underlying explanations to load patterns. Due to economic and technical problems with electricity peak load, it is important to gain knowledge about how the load patterns of households contribute to power peaks, and to what extent households would accept a shifting of the load at certain critical periods.



This paper emphasizes these questions through a case study of ten households with electric space heating in southern Sweden. In these ten households, electricity use for heating, domestic hot water and... (More)
Most energy behaviour studies on households focus on the questions how and why we use energy and what can be done to lower energy consumption. Very few studies raise the question of when energy is used or examine the underlying explanations to load patterns. Due to economic and technical problems with electricity peak load, it is important to gain knowledge about how the load patterns of households contribute to power peaks, and to what extent households would accept a shifting of the load at certain critical periods.



This paper emphasizes these questions through a case study of ten households with electric space heating in southern Sweden. In these ten households, electricity use for heating, domestic hot water and appliances were measured as three partial loads with five minutes resolution. Energy diaries were kept by the household members. The combination of these two sets of data made it possible to see what appliances were used and what activities were carried out during peaks.



The highest power peaks in the households were based on electricity use for appliances, such as saunas, washing machines, dishwashers, and ovens. Coincidental use of large appliances, for example sauna and shower, gave the very highest peaks. Interviews indicated that there was acceptance among the households concerning a shift in the use of certain appliances at certain periods. However, all households did not have the same possibility to do this, due to their specific conditions and time restrictions. (Less)
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publishing date
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Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
[Host publication title missing]
publisher
EEDAL'06 Energy Efficiency in domestic appliances and lighting. Conference Proceedings 2006
conference name
Energy Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting (EEDAL)
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
693678b9-f52d-4393-a3b0-a2f79319991d (old id 576536)
alternative location
http://mail.mtprog.com/Presentations/Session_C/C3KerstinSernhed.pdf
date added to LUP
2008-02-19 12:30:17
date last changed
2016-06-29 09:05:04
@inproceedings{693678b9-f52d-4393-a3b0-a2f79319991d,
  abstract     = {Most energy behaviour studies on households focus on the questions how and why we use energy and what can be done to lower energy consumption. Very few studies raise the question of when energy is used or examine the underlying explanations to load patterns. Due to economic and technical problems with electricity peak load, it is important to gain knowledge about how the load patterns of households contribute to power peaks, and to what extent households would accept a shifting of the load at certain critical periods.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
This paper emphasizes these questions through a case study of ten households with electric space heating in southern Sweden. In these ten households, electricity use for heating, domestic hot water and appliances were measured as three partial loads with five minutes resolution. Energy diaries were kept by the household members. The combination of these two sets of data made it possible to see what appliances were used and what activities were carried out during peaks.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The highest power peaks in the households were based on electricity use for appliances, such as saunas, washing machines, dishwashers, and ovens. Coincidental use of large appliances, for example sauna and shower, gave the very highest peaks. Interviews indicated that there was acceptance among the households concerning a shift in the use of certain appliances at certain periods. However, all households did not have the same possibility to do this, due to their specific conditions and time restrictions.},
  author       = {Sernhed, Kerstin},
  booktitle    = {[Host publication title missing]},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {EEDAL'06 Energy Efficiency in domestic appliances and lighting. Conference Proceedings 2006},
  title        = {What's on the top? Household load patterns and peak load problems},
  year         = {2006},
}