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Efficiency of the flagellar propulsion of Escherichia coli in confined microfluidic geometries

Libberton, Ben LU ; Binz, Marie ; Van Zalinge, Harm and Nicolau, Dan V. (2019) In Physical Review E 99(1).
Abstract

Bacterial movement in confined spaces is routinely encountered either in a natural environment or in artificial structures. Consequently, the ability to understand and predict the behavior of motile bacterial cells in confined geometries is essential to many applications, spanning from the more classical, such as the management complex microbial networks involved in diseases, biomanufacturing, mining, and environment, to the more recent, such as single cell DNA sequencing and computation with biological agents. Fortunately, the development of this understanding can be helped by the decades-long advances in semiconductor microfabrication, which allow the design and the construction of complex confining structures used as test beds for... (More)

Bacterial movement in confined spaces is routinely encountered either in a natural environment or in artificial structures. Consequently, the ability to understand and predict the behavior of motile bacterial cells in confined geometries is essential to many applications, spanning from the more classical, such as the management complex microbial networks involved in diseases, biomanufacturing, mining, and environment, to the more recent, such as single cell DNA sequencing and computation with biological agents. Fortunately, the development of this understanding can be helped by the decades-long advances in semiconductor microfabrication, which allow the design and the construction of complex confining structures used as test beds for the study of bacterial motility. To this end, here we use microfabricated channels with varying sizes to study the interaction of Escherichia coli with solid confining spaces. It is shown that an optimal channel size exists for which the hydrostatic potential allows the most efficient movement of the cells. The improved understanding of how bacteria move will result in the ability to design better microfluidic structures based on their interaction with bacterial movement.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Physical Review E
volume
99
issue
1
article number
012408
publisher
American Physical Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:85059854583
ISSN
2470-0045
DOI
10.1103/PhysRevE.99.012408
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
58c9f2ba-13c4-403f-8218-17daa2c81da6
date added to LUP
2019-01-23 12:46:28
date last changed
2020-01-16 03:43:30
@article{58c9f2ba-13c4-403f-8218-17daa2c81da6,
  abstract     = {<p>Bacterial movement in confined spaces is routinely encountered either in a natural environment or in artificial structures. Consequently, the ability to understand and predict the behavior of motile bacterial cells in confined geometries is essential to many applications, spanning from the more classical, such as the management complex microbial networks involved in diseases, biomanufacturing, mining, and environment, to the more recent, such as single cell DNA sequencing and computation with biological agents. Fortunately, the development of this understanding can be helped by the decades-long advances in semiconductor microfabrication, which allow the design and the construction of complex confining structures used as test beds for the study of bacterial motility. To this end, here we use microfabricated channels with varying sizes to study the interaction of Escherichia coli with solid confining spaces. It is shown that an optimal channel size exists for which the hydrostatic potential allows the most efficient movement of the cells. The improved understanding of how bacteria move will result in the ability to design better microfluidic structures based on their interaction with bacterial movement.</p>},
  author       = {Libberton, Ben and Binz, Marie and Van Zalinge, Harm and Nicolau, Dan V.},
  issn         = {2470-0045},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {American Physical Society},
  series       = {Physical Review E},
  title        = {Efficiency of the flagellar propulsion of Escherichia coli in confined microfluidic geometries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.99.012408},
  doi          = {10.1103/PhysRevE.99.012408},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2019},
}