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Initial usability testing of navigation and interaction methods in virtual environments: Developing usable interfaces for brain injury rehabilitation

Wallergård, Mattias LU ; Lindén, Anita; Davies, Roy LU ; Boschian, Kerstin; Sonesson, Bengt; Minör, Ulf and Johansson, Gerd LU (2007) In Presence 16(1). p.16-44
Abstract
It is speculated that virtual environments (VE) might be used as a training tool in brain injury rehabilitation. The rehabilitation process often involves practicing so-called instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), such as shopping, cooking, and using a telephone. If a brain injury patient is to practice such activities in a VE, the patient must be able to navigate the viewpoint and interact with virtual objects in an understandable way. People with brain injury may be less tolerant to a poor interface and a VE might therefore become unusable due to, for example, an unsuitable input device. In this paper we present two studies aimed to do initial usability testing of VE interaction methods on people without experience of 3D... (More)
It is speculated that virtual environments (VE) might be used as a training tool in brain injury rehabilitation. The rehabilitation process often involves practicing so-called instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), such as shopping, cooking, and using a telephone. If a brain injury patient is to practice such activities in a VE, the patient must be able to navigate the viewpoint and interact with virtual objects in an understandable way. People with brain injury may be less tolerant to a poor interface and a VE might therefore become unusable due to, for example, an unsuitable input device. In this paper we present two studies aimed to do initial usability testing of VE interaction methods on people without experience of 3D computer graphics. In the first study four navigation input device configurations were compared: the IntelliKeys keyboard and the Microsoft Sidewinder joystick, both programmed with two and three degrees of freedom (DOF). The purpose of the second study was to evaluate a method for interaction with objects, and to find a sufficiently usable input device for this purpose. The keyboard was found to be more suitable for navigation tasks in which the user wants to give the viewpoint a more advantageous position and orientation for carrying out a specific task. No big differences could be found between two and three DOFs. The method for interaction with objects was found to work sufficiently well. No difference in performance could be found between mouse and touch screen, but some evidence was found that they affect the usability of the VE interface in different ways. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Presence
volume
16
issue
1
pages
16 - 44
publisher
MIT Press
external identifiers
  • WOS:000244149200003
  • Scopus:33847280291
ISSN
1054-7460
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
743ff7be-e5d9-4b32-89b5-2e13ac62a15b (old id 597877)
alternative location
http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/pres.16.1.16
http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1241859
date added to LUP
2007-11-14 14:15:44
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:42:00
@article{743ff7be-e5d9-4b32-89b5-2e13ac62a15b,
  abstract     = {It is speculated that virtual environments (VE) might be used as a training tool in brain injury rehabilitation. The rehabilitation process often involves practicing so-called instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), such as shopping, cooking, and using a telephone. If a brain injury patient is to practice such activities in a VE, the patient must be able to navigate the viewpoint and interact with virtual objects in an understandable way. People with brain injury may be less tolerant to a poor interface and a VE might therefore become unusable due to, for example, an unsuitable input device. In this paper we present two studies aimed to do initial usability testing of VE interaction methods on people without experience of 3D computer graphics. In the first study four navigation input device configurations were compared: the IntelliKeys keyboard and the Microsoft Sidewinder joystick, both programmed with two and three degrees of freedom (DOF). The purpose of the second study was to evaluate a method for interaction with objects, and to find a sufficiently usable input device for this purpose. The keyboard was found to be more suitable for navigation tasks in which the user wants to give the viewpoint a more advantageous position and orientation for carrying out a specific task. No big differences could be found between two and three DOFs. The method for interaction with objects was found to work sufficiently well. No difference in performance could be found between mouse and touch screen, but some evidence was found that they affect the usability of the VE interface in different ways.},
  author       = {Wallergård, Mattias and Lindén, Anita and Davies, Roy and Boschian, Kerstin and Sonesson, Bengt and Minör, Ulf and Johansson, Gerd},
  issn         = {1054-7460},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {16--44},
  publisher    = {MIT Press},
  series       = {Presence},
  title        = {Initial usability testing of navigation and interaction methods in virtual environments: Developing usable interfaces for brain injury rehabilitation},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2007},
}