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Nutraceutical inhibition of muscle proteolysis : a role of diallyl sulphide in the treatment of muscle wasting

Olivan, Mireia; Busquets, Sílvia; Figueras, Maite; Fontes Oliveira, Cibely LU ; Toledo, Míriam; Sette, Angelica; Ventura da Silva, Paula; Barberis, Pablo; Argilés, Josep M and López-Soriano, Francisco J (2011) In Clinical Nutrition 30(1). p.7-33
Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The abnormalities associated with cancer cachexia include anorexia, weight loss, muscle loss and atrophy, anaemia and alterations in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the anti-wasting effects of some nutraceuticals such as genistein, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and diallyl sulphide (DAS).

METHODS: The in vitro effects of these nutraceuticals on proteolysis were examined in muscle cell cultures submitted to hyperthermia. The in vivo effects of DAS were also tested in cachectic tumour-bearing rats (Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma).

RESULTS: Although all the nutraceuticals tested inhibited muscle proteolysis, the most promising... (More)

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The abnormalities associated with cancer cachexia include anorexia, weight loss, muscle loss and atrophy, anaemia and alterations in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the anti-wasting effects of some nutraceuticals such as genistein, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and diallyl sulphide (DAS).

METHODS: The in vitro effects of these nutraceuticals on proteolysis were examined in muscle cell cultures submitted to hyperthermia. The in vivo effects of DAS were also tested in cachectic tumour-bearing rats (Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma).

RESULTS: Although all the nutraceuticals tested inhibited muscle proteolysis, the most promising effects were related with DAS. In vivo administration of DAS only leads to a small improvement in tibialis muscle and heart weights; however, administration of DAS to healthy animals increased all muscle weights, this being associated with a decreased gene expression of proteolytic systems components.

CONCLUSION: It may be suggested that DAS could be used to improve muscle mass during healthy conditions.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Allyl Compounds, Animals, Anorexia, Cachexia, Catechin, Cells, Cultured, Dietary Supplements, Genistein, Male, Muscle, Skeletal, Muscular Atrophy, Neoplasms, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Stilbenes, Sulfides, Weight Loss, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Clinical Nutrition
volume
30
issue
1
pages
7 - 33
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:79451475123
ISSN
1532-1983
DOI
10.1016/j.clnu.2010.06.004
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
5adafb56-65b9-4306-b214-2ecc614d2be1
date added to LUP
2017-02-28 16:18:02
date last changed
2017-03-05 04:41:26
@article{5adafb56-65b9-4306-b214-2ecc614d2be1,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND &amp; AIMS: The abnormalities associated with cancer cachexia include anorexia, weight loss, muscle loss and atrophy, anaemia and alterations in carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the anti-wasting effects of some nutraceuticals such as genistein, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and diallyl sulphide (DAS).</p><p>METHODS: The in vitro effects of these nutraceuticals on proteolysis were examined in muscle cell cultures submitted to hyperthermia. The in vivo effects of DAS were also tested in cachectic tumour-bearing rats (Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma).</p><p>RESULTS: Although all the nutraceuticals tested inhibited muscle proteolysis, the most promising effects were related with DAS. In vivo administration of DAS only leads to a small improvement in tibialis muscle and heart weights; however, administration of DAS to healthy animals increased all muscle weights, this being associated with a decreased gene expression of proteolytic systems components.</p><p>CONCLUSION: It may be suggested that DAS could be used to improve muscle mass during healthy conditions.</p>},
  author       = {Olivan, Mireia and Busquets, Sílvia and Figueras, Maite and Fontes Oliveira, Cibely and Toledo, Míriam and Sette, Angelica and Ventura da Silva, Paula and Barberis, Pablo and Argilés, Josep M and López-Soriano, Francisco J},
  issn         = {1532-1983},
  keyword      = {Allyl Compounds,Animals,Anorexia,Cachexia,Catechin,Cells, Cultured,Dietary Supplements,Genistein,Male,Muscle, Skeletal,Muscular Atrophy,Neoplasms,Rats,Rats, Wistar,Stilbenes,Sulfides,Weight Loss,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {7--33},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinical Nutrition},
  title        = {Nutraceutical inhibition of muscle proteolysis : a role of diallyl sulphide in the treatment of muscle wasting},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2010.06.004},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2011},
}