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Compliance with guidelines for postoperative pain management in infants and children

Dürango, Sofie; Åkeson, Pia Karlsland LU ; Jonsson, Elin; Nilsson, Eva LU and Åkeson, Jonas LU (2017) In International Journal of Healthcare Management 10(4). p.259-264
Abstract

Background: Postoperative pain is still often being inadequately assessed and/or recorded in infants and young children despite evidence-based guidelines. Objectives: This prospective, observational study in a paediatric postoperative ward at a Swedish university hospital was designed to evaluate interventional effects on pain management by briefly reminding nursing staff of corresponding local guidelines. Methods: Individual structured postoperative information on the first day and night after mainly otorhinolaryngeal or plastic surgery was obtained in 100 pediatric patients from on-site bedside observation protocols, patient records, and telephone interviews over two 5-week periods before and after a study intervention with brief... (More)

Background: Postoperative pain is still often being inadequately assessed and/or recorded in infants and young children despite evidence-based guidelines. Objectives: This prospective, observational study in a paediatric postoperative ward at a Swedish university hospital was designed to evaluate interventional effects on pain management by briefly reminding nursing staff of corresponding local guidelines. Methods: Individual structured postoperative information on the first day and night after mainly otorhinolaryngeal or plastic surgery was obtained in 100 pediatric patients from on-site bedside observation protocols, patient records, and telephone interviews over two 5-week periods before and after a study intervention with brief systematic information on local guideline contents. Results: The intervention was followed by significantly more assessments (P = 0.0012), hourly assessments (P < 0.0001), and use of validated tools for assessment (P < 0.0001) of pain intensity in out-hospital patients, but by no change in guardian satisfaction. There were non-significant corresponding changes in in-hospital patients. Conclusions: Bedside compliance with guidelines for postoperative pain management can be considerably improved in out-hospital (and possibly also in-hospital) paediatric patients by a structured brief reminder of existing guideline contents. Larger prospective studies are required to determine the importance of bedside compliance with clinical guidelines for postoperative comfort and safety in infants and children.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Guideline, In-hospital, Management, Out-hospital, Outcome and process assessment, Pain, Patient satisfaction, Patients, Postoperative care
in
International Journal of Healthcare Management
volume
10
issue
4
pages
259 - 264
publisher
Maney Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:84996565296
ISSN
2047-9700
DOI
10.1080/20479700.2015.1114710
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5dfebe65-6baa-458a-b986-3cf82124584c
date added to LUP
2016-12-12 07:48:15
date last changed
2017-11-13 10:08:07
@article{5dfebe65-6baa-458a-b986-3cf82124584c,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Postoperative pain is still often being inadequately assessed and/or recorded in infants and young children despite evidence-based guidelines. Objectives: This prospective, observational study in a paediatric postoperative ward at a Swedish university hospital was designed to evaluate interventional effects on pain management by briefly reminding nursing staff of corresponding local guidelines. Methods: Individual structured postoperative information on the first day and night after mainly otorhinolaryngeal or plastic surgery was obtained in 100 pediatric patients from on-site bedside observation protocols, patient records, and telephone interviews over two 5-week periods before and after a study intervention with brief systematic information on local guideline contents. Results: The intervention was followed by significantly more assessments (P = 0.0012), hourly assessments (P &lt; 0.0001), and use of validated tools for assessment (P &lt; 0.0001) of pain intensity in out-hospital patients, but by no change in guardian satisfaction. There were non-significant corresponding changes in in-hospital patients. Conclusions: Bedside compliance with guidelines for postoperative pain management can be considerably improved in out-hospital (and possibly also in-hospital) paediatric patients by a structured brief reminder of existing guideline contents. Larger prospective studies are required to determine the importance of bedside compliance with clinical guidelines for postoperative comfort and safety in infants and children.</p>},
  author       = {Dürango, Sofie and Åkeson, Pia Karlsland and Jonsson, Elin and Nilsson, Eva and Åkeson, Jonas},
  issn         = {2047-9700},
  keyword      = {Guideline,In-hospital,Management,Out-hospital,Outcome and process assessment,Pain,Patient satisfaction,Patients,Postoperative care},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {259--264},
  publisher    = {Maney Publishing},
  series       = {International Journal of Healthcare Management},
  title        = {Compliance with guidelines for postoperative pain management in infants and children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20479700.2015.1114710},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2017},
}