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A prospective study, using sibling oocytes, examining the effect of 30 seconds versus 90 minutes gamete co-incubation in IVF.

Bungum, Mona LU ; Bungum, Leif and Humaidan, Peter (2006) In Human Reproduction 21(2). p.518-523
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Traditionally oocytes have been exposed to sperm overnight, for 16-20 h. This long period of co-incubation, however, has been shown to create problems with high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may affect embryo viability and cause hardening of the zona pellucida. Recently, a positive effect of reducing the co-incubation time to 90-120 min was reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a further reduction of the co-incubation period could benefit the outcome of IVF. METHODS: In this prospective study, 777 sibling oocytes from 81 women undergoing IVF were divided via alternate allocation to co-incubation for either 30 s (ultrashort co-incubation) (group A) or for 90 min (standard co-incubation)... (More)
BACKGROUND: Traditionally oocytes have been exposed to sperm overnight, for 16-20 h. This long period of co-incubation, however, has been shown to create problems with high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may affect embryo viability and cause hardening of the zona pellucida. Recently, a positive effect of reducing the co-incubation time to 90-120 min was reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a further reduction of the co-incubation period could benefit the outcome of IVF. METHODS: In this prospective study, 777 sibling oocytes from 81 women undergoing IVF were divided via alternate allocation to co-incubation for either 30 s (ultrashort co-incubation) (group A) or for 90 min (standard co-incubation) (group B). Endpoints were normal fertilization (two-pronuclear, 2PN), polyspermy (> 2PN), embryo quality (EQ), clinical pregnancy (CP) and implantation (IR). RESULTS: The normal fertilization rates of the two groups were comparable: group A 58.6% versus group B 58.0%. Significantly lower rates of polyspermy were seen in group A compared to group B (2.8 versus 7.2%, P = 0.008). No statistically significant differences in EQ, CP or IR were seen. CONCLUSION: This is the first study demonstrating the achievement of good fertilization rates in IVF with ultrashort co-incubation. Significantly lower rates of polyspermy were seen in the group with ultrashort compared to the standard co-incubation group. Further studies are, however, needed in order to evaluate whether ultrashort co-incubation has any effect on the outcome of IVF. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
fertilization, IVF, polyspermy, gamete co-incubation
in
Human Reproduction
volume
21
issue
2
pages
518 - 523
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000234780400029
  • pmid:16239314
  • scopus:31544469495
ISSN
0268-1161
DOI
10.1093/humrep/dei350
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5f237a92-3417-4aea-9d6c-b255c135aef1 (old id 144497)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16239314&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-16 15:06:43
date last changed
2019-10-13 03:41:03
@article{5f237a92-3417-4aea-9d6c-b255c135aef1,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Traditionally oocytes have been exposed to sperm overnight, for 16-20 h. This long period of co-incubation, however, has been shown to create problems with high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may affect embryo viability and cause hardening of the zona pellucida. Recently, a positive effect of reducing the co-incubation time to 90-120 min was reported. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a further reduction of the co-incubation period could benefit the outcome of IVF. METHODS: In this prospective study, 777 sibling oocytes from 81 women undergoing IVF were divided via alternate allocation to co-incubation for either 30 s (ultrashort co-incubation) (group A) or for 90 min (standard co-incubation) (group B). Endpoints were normal fertilization (two-pronuclear, 2PN), polyspermy (> 2PN), embryo quality (EQ), clinical pregnancy (CP) and implantation (IR). RESULTS: The normal fertilization rates of the two groups were comparable: group A 58.6% versus group B 58.0%. Significantly lower rates of polyspermy were seen in group A compared to group B (2.8 versus 7.2%, P = 0.008). No statistically significant differences in EQ, CP or IR were seen. CONCLUSION: This is the first study demonstrating the achievement of good fertilization rates in IVF with ultrashort co-incubation. Significantly lower rates of polyspermy were seen in the group with ultrashort compared to the standard co-incubation group. Further studies are, however, needed in order to evaluate whether ultrashort co-incubation has any effect on the outcome of IVF.},
  author       = {Bungum, Mona and Bungum, Leif and Humaidan, Peter},
  issn         = {0268-1161},
  keyword      = {fertilization,IVF,polyspermy,gamete co-incubation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {518--523},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Human Reproduction},
  title        = {A prospective study, using sibling oocytes, examining the effect of 30 seconds versus 90 minutes gamete co-incubation in IVF.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dei350},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2006},
}