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"They do what they think is the best for me." Frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in their care during hospitalization

Ekdahl, Anne W LU ; Andersson, Lars and Friedrichsen, Maria (2010) In Patient Education and Counseling 80(2). p.40-233
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To deepen the knowledge of frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in medical decision making during hospitalization.

METHODS: Qualitative study using content analysis of semi-structured interviews.

RESULTS: Patient participation to frail elderly means information, not the wish to take part in decisions about their medical treatments. They view the hospital care system as an institution of power with which they cannot argue. Participation is complicated by barriers such as the numerous persons involved in their care who do not know them and their preferences, differing treatment strategies among doctors, fast patient turnover in hospitals, stressed personnel and linguistic problems due to doctors not... (More)

OBJECTIVE: To deepen the knowledge of frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in medical decision making during hospitalization.

METHODS: Qualitative study using content analysis of semi-structured interviews.

RESULTS: Patient participation to frail elderly means information, not the wish to take part in decisions about their medical treatments. They view the hospital care system as an institution of power with which they cannot argue. Participation is complicated by barriers such as the numerous persons involved in their care who do not know them and their preferences, differing treatment strategies among doctors, fast patient turnover in hospitals, stressed personnel and linguistic problems due to doctors not always speaking the patient's own language.

CONCLUSION: The results of the study show that, to frail elderly patients, participation in medical decision making is primarily a question of good communication and information, not participation in decisions about medical treatments.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: More time should be given to thorough information and as few people as possible should be involved in the care of frail elderly. Linguistic problems should be identified to make it possible to take the necessary precautions to prevent negative impact on patient participation.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Communication, Decision Making, Female, Frail Elderly, Hospitalization, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Patient Participation, Patient Preference, Patient Satisfaction, Physician-Patient Relations, Physicians, Qualitative Research, Journal Article
in
Patient Education and Counseling
volume
80
issue
2
pages
8 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:77954310707
ISSN
0738-3991
DOI
10.1016/j.pec.2009.10.026
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
605b956e-4aa2-469f-8e76-ff391994869f
date added to LUP
2017-05-21 10:00:16
date last changed
2018-07-01 04:45:38
@article{605b956e-4aa2-469f-8e76-ff391994869f,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: To deepen the knowledge of frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in medical decision making during hospitalization.</p><p>METHODS: Qualitative study using content analysis of semi-structured interviews.</p><p>RESULTS: Patient participation to frail elderly means information, not the wish to take part in decisions about their medical treatments. They view the hospital care system as an institution of power with which they cannot argue. Participation is complicated by barriers such as the numerous persons involved in their care who do not know them and their preferences, differing treatment strategies among doctors, fast patient turnover in hospitals, stressed personnel and linguistic problems due to doctors not always speaking the patient's own language.</p><p>CONCLUSION: The results of the study show that, to frail elderly patients, participation in medical decision making is primarily a question of good communication and information, not participation in decisions about medical treatments.</p><p>PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: More time should be given to thorough information and as few people as possible should be involved in the care of frail elderly. Linguistic problems should be identified to make it possible to take the necessary precautions to prevent negative impact on patient participation.</p>},
  author       = {Ekdahl, Anne W and Andersson, Lars and Friedrichsen, Maria},
  issn         = {0738-3991},
  keyword      = {Aged,Aged, 80 and over,Communication,Decision Making,Female,Frail Elderly,Hospitalization,Humans,Interviews as Topic,Male,Patient Participation,Patient Preference,Patient Satisfaction,Physician-Patient Relations,Physicians,Qualitative Research,Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {40--233},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Patient Education and Counseling},
  title        = {"They do what they think is the best for me." Frail elderly patients' preferences for participation in their care during hospitalization},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2009.10.026},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2010},
}