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Predicted properties of eclipsing binaries observable by Gaia

Dischler, Johann LU and Söderhjelm, Staffan LU (2005) Symposium - The Three-Dimensional Universe with Gaia In European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP 576. p.569-572
Abstract
Using a population synthesis model we estimate the fraction of stars of different types that are likely to show eclipses, as a function of the period. The population model is based on the bse-code from Hurley et al. (2002) which is a rapid binary evolution code that include all common effects in close binaries such as mass transfer, tidal locking, wind etc. We use this to evolve millions of systems from original distributions in separation, mass and eccentricity, with ages between zero and 12 Gyr, to get a population of systems representative of our Galaxy. The binary data from our model are then analysed in order to, statistically, see how many eclipsing systems we should have. This is done with a simple model where we neglect... (More)
Using a population synthesis model we estimate the fraction of stars of different types that are likely to show eclipses, as a function of the period. The population model is based on the bse-code from Hurley et al. (2002) which is a rapid binary evolution code that include all common effects in close binaries such as mass transfer, tidal locking, wind etc. We use this to evolve millions of systems from original distributions in separation, mass and eccentricity, with ages between zero and 12 Gyr, to get a population of systems representative of our Galaxy. The binary data from our model are then analysed in order to, statistically, see how many eclipsing systems we should have. This is done with a simple model where we neglect limb-darkening and other complicating effects. Assuming a random distribution of the inclination angle the probability of an eclipse of a given depth, Am, can easily be calculated. Adding a reasonable fraction of true single stars, we can finally estimate the fraction of eclipsing binaries in limited areas of the HR-diagram, as a function of the period. A first comparison with observational data from the Hipparcos mission shows quite satisfying agreement, and extrapolation to Gaia should thus be a natural application. We find that Gaia will observe about 500 000 eclipsing binaries, this (surprisingly) small number arises from the fact that many eclipsing systems will not be detected by Gaia. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Population synthesis, Binaries, Eclipses, Gaia
in
European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP
volume
576
pages
569 - 572
publisher
European Space Agency
conference name
Symposium - The Three-Dimensional Universe with Gaia
external identifiers
  • wos:000229610000108
  • scopus:23744467498
ISSN
1609-042X
0379-6566
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
63db4c80-d5c7-4bba-9683-70609536ed09 (old id 615719)
alternative location
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ESASP.576..569D
date added to LUP
2007-11-25 09:45:39
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:48:02
@inproceedings{63db4c80-d5c7-4bba-9683-70609536ed09,
  abstract     = {Using a population synthesis model we estimate the fraction of stars of different types that are likely to show eclipses, as a function of the period. The population model is based on the bse-code from Hurley et al. (2002) which is a rapid binary evolution code that include all common effects in close binaries such as mass transfer, tidal locking, wind etc. We use this to evolve millions of systems from original distributions in separation, mass and eccentricity, with ages between zero and 12 Gyr, to get a population of systems representative of our Galaxy. The binary data from our model are then analysed in order to, statistically, see how many eclipsing systems we should have. This is done with a simple model where we neglect limb-darkening and other complicating effects. Assuming a random distribution of the inclination angle the probability of an eclipse of a given depth, Am, can easily be calculated. Adding a reasonable fraction of true single stars, we can finally estimate the fraction of eclipsing binaries in limited areas of the HR-diagram, as a function of the period. A first comparison with observational data from the Hipparcos mission shows quite satisfying agreement, and extrapolation to Gaia should thus be a natural application. We find that Gaia will observe about 500 000 eclipsing binaries, this (surprisingly) small number arises from the fact that many eclipsing systems will not be detected by Gaia.},
  author       = {Dischler, Johann and Söderhjelm, Staffan},
  booktitle    = {European Space Agency, (Special Publication) ESA SP},
  issn         = {1609-042X},
  keyword      = {Population synthesis,Binaries,Eclipses,Gaia},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {569--572},
  publisher    = {European Space Agency},
  title        = {Predicted properties of eclipsing binaries observable by Gaia},
  volume       = {576},
  year         = {2005},
}