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We-experiences, common knowledge and the mode approach to collective intentionality

Blomberg, Olle LU (2017) In Journal of Social Philosophy 49(1).
Abstract
According to we-mode accounts of collective intentionality, an experience is a “we-experience” in virtue of the way or “mode” in which the content of the experience is given to the subject of experience. The accounts are supposed to explain how a we-experience can have the phenomenal character of being given to the subject “as ours” rather than merely “as my experience” (Zahavi 2015), in a relatively conceptually and cognitively undemanding way. Galotti and Frith (2013) and Schmitz (2017) present we-mode accounts that are supposed to avoid the need for the subjects of experience to have common knowledge of each other’s perceptual beliefs. In this paper, in part drawing on Schutz’s writings on “the pure We-relationship”, I argue that appeal... (More)
According to we-mode accounts of collective intentionality, an experience is a “we-experience” in virtue of the way or “mode” in which the content of the experience is given to the subject of experience. The accounts are supposed to explain how a we-experience can have the phenomenal character of being given to the subject “as ours” rather than merely “as my experience” (Zahavi 2015), in a relatively conceptually and cognitively undemanding way. Galotti and Frith (2013) and Schmitz (2017) present we-mode accounts that are supposed to avoid the need for the subjects of experience to have common knowledge of each other’s perceptual beliefs. In this paper, in part drawing on Schutz’s writings on “the pure We-relationship”, I argue that appeal to a we-mode does not render common knowledge unnecessary. To explain when we-experiences are veridical, we-mode accounts must (i) explain how a we-experience can enable rational interpersonal coordination in some high-risk situations and (ii) explain why what is experienced is “out in the open” between the subjects of the we-experience. To do this, proponents of we-mode accounts need an account of common knowledge. In addition, they need must also specify which inferences that hold between we-mode and I-mode attitudes, and explain why they hold. In light of this, we-mode accounts fare no better than content accounts in illuminating how cognitively undemanding forms of collective intentionality are possible. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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in press
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Journal of Social Philosophy
volume
49
issue
1
publisher
Wiley Online Library
ISSN
1467-9833
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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618d7244-1fe2-400c-9b21-53a0c9574f65
date added to LUP
2017-10-14 15:48:28
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2018-01-04 10:05:28
@article{618d7244-1fe2-400c-9b21-53a0c9574f65,
  abstract     = {According to we-mode accounts of collective intentionality, an experience is a “we-experience” in virtue of the way or “mode” in which the content of the experience is given to the subject of experience. The accounts are supposed to explain how a we-experience can have the phenomenal character of being given to the subject “as ours” rather than merely “as my experience” (Zahavi 2015), in a relatively conceptually and cognitively undemanding way. Galotti and Frith (2013) and Schmitz (2017) present we-mode accounts that are supposed to avoid the need for the subjects of experience to have common knowledge of each other’s perceptual beliefs. In this paper, in part drawing on Schutz’s writings on “the pure We-relationship”, I argue that appeal to a we-mode does not render common knowledge unnecessary. To explain when we-experiences are veridical, we-mode accounts must (i) explain how a we-experience can enable rational interpersonal coordination in some high-risk situations and (ii) explain why what is experienced is “out in the open” between the subjects of the we-experience. To do this, proponents of we-mode accounts need an account of common knowledge. In addition, they need must also specify which inferences that hold between we-mode and I-mode attitudes, and explain why they hold. In light of this, we-mode accounts fare no better than content accounts in illuminating how cognitively undemanding forms of collective intentionality are possible.},
  author       = {Blomberg, Olle},
  issn         = {1467-9833},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {Wiley Online Library},
  series       = {Journal of Social Philosophy},
  title        = {We-experiences, common knowledge and the mode approach to collective intentionality},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2017},
}