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The validity of self-reported body mass index in a population-based osteoarthritis study

Magnusson, Karin LU ; Haugen, Ida K. ; Østerås, Nina ; Nordsletten, Lars ; Natvig, Bård and Hagen, Kåre Birger (2014) In BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 15(1). p.1-5
Abstract

Background: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). The majority of obesity research in OA is performed using self-reported BMI-data, however, its validity in persons with OA is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the validity of self-reported body mass index (BMI) in persons with and without clinical osteoarthritis (OA) in a population-based survey. Methods: Height and weight were self-reported, and thereafter measured in 600 persons with and without clinical OA according to the American College of Rheumatology-criteria (knees, hips and/or hands). We compared the differences between measured and self-reported heights, weights and BMIs (kg/m2) for the two groups and explored whether... (More)

Background: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). The majority of obesity research in OA is performed using self-reported BMI-data, however, its validity in persons with OA is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the validity of self-reported body mass index (BMI) in persons with and without clinical osteoarthritis (OA) in a population-based survey. Methods: Height and weight were self-reported, and thereafter measured in 600 persons with and without clinical OA according to the American College of Rheumatology-criteria (knees, hips and/or hands). We compared the differences between measured and self-reported heights, weights and BMIs (kg/m2) for the two groups and explored whether demographic/clinical factors were associated with inaccurate reporting in the OA patients using multivariate linear regression analyses. Results: Mean (SD) age was 64 (8.7) years and 412 (69%) were women. Participants with clinical OA (n = 449) underreported their BMI to a greater extent than participants without clinical OA (n = 151) [mean (SD) difference 1.34 (1.68) kg/m2 and 0.78 (1.40) kg/m2 (p = 0.000), respectively]. There was a strong dose-dependent association between higher measured BMI and greater underreporting of BMI in multivariate analyses (BMI 25-29.99 kg/m2: B = 0.40, 95% CI, 0.06, 0.77), BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2: B = 1.30, 95% CI, 0.86, 1.75) in the clinical OA patients. A higher age as well as the time interval from self-reported to measured BMI-data were associated with inaccurate reporting. Conclusions: Researchers using self-reported height and weight data should be aware of limited agreement with actual height and weight in overweight and obese individuals with clinical OA.

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author
; ; ; ; and
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Age, Body mass index, Obesity, Osteoarthritis, Self-report, Validity
in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
volume
15
issue
1
article number
442
pages
1 - 5
publisher
BioMed Central (BMC)
external identifiers
  • pmid:25519511
  • scopus:84924280283
ISSN
1471-2474
DOI
10.1186/1471-2474-15-442
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
61fbd634-1d10-4060-bc4b-c7904e828ab2
date added to LUP
2018-11-29 15:17:52
date last changed
2020-01-16 03:39:16
@article{61fbd634-1d10-4060-bc4b-c7904e828ab2,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). The majority of obesity research in OA is performed using self-reported BMI-data, however, its validity in persons with OA is unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the validity of self-reported body mass index (BMI) in persons with and without clinical osteoarthritis (OA) in a population-based survey. Methods: Height and weight were self-reported, and thereafter measured in 600 persons with and without clinical OA according to the American College of Rheumatology-criteria (knees, hips and/or hands). We compared the differences between measured and self-reported heights, weights and BMIs (kg/m<sup>2</sup>) for the two groups and explored whether demographic/clinical factors were associated with inaccurate reporting in the OA patients using multivariate linear regression analyses. Results: Mean (SD) age was 64 (8.7) years and 412 (69%) were women. Participants with clinical OA (n = 449) underreported their BMI to a greater extent than participants without clinical OA (n = 151) [mean (SD) difference 1.34 (1.68) kg/m<sup>2</sup> and 0.78 (1.40) kg/m<sup>2</sup> (p = 0.000), respectively]. There was a strong dose-dependent association between higher measured BMI and greater underreporting of BMI in multivariate analyses (BMI 25-29.99 kg/m<sup>2</sup>: B = 0.40, 95% CI, 0.06, 0.77), BMI ≥ 30 kg/m<sup>2</sup>: B = 1.30, 95% CI, 0.86, 1.75) in the clinical OA patients. A higher age as well as the time interval from self-reported to measured BMI-data were associated with inaccurate reporting. Conclusions: Researchers using self-reported height and weight data should be aware of limited agreement with actual height and weight in overweight and obese individuals with clinical OA.</p>},
  author       = {Magnusson, Karin and Haugen, Ida K. and Østerås, Nina and Nordsletten, Lars and Natvig, Bård and Hagen, Kåre Birger},
  issn         = {1471-2474},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--5},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central (BMC)},
  series       = {BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders},
  title        = {The validity of self-reported body mass index in a population-based osteoarthritis study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-15-442},
  doi          = {10.1186/1471-2474-15-442},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2014},
}