Advanced

The Top Runner policy concept: Pass it down?

Nordqvist, Joakim LU (2007) ECEEE 2007 Summer Study: Saving Energy -just do it! In Proceedings of the eceee 2007 Summer Study: Saving energy – just do it! p.1209-1214
Abstract
In the 1990s, Japanese energy regulators were concerned by the fact that new generations of energy using appliances and products no longer displayed successive use-phase energy efficiency improvements, such as those that characterised product development in Japan after the 1970s oil crises. Therefore, in 1999, Japan incepted its Top Runner programme, designed to rejuvenate the lost momentum. Several years into the scheme, the programme, as a whole, seems generally to be perceived as successful by Japanese stakeholders.



The approach now attracts increasing attention outside of its country of origin. In 2005, the German Bundestag assigned to the federal government the task of promoting Top Runner policies also in Europe.... (More)
In the 1990s, Japanese energy regulators were concerned by the fact that new generations of energy using appliances and products no longer displayed successive use-phase energy efficiency improvements, such as those that characterised product development in Japan after the 1970s oil crises. Therefore, in 1999, Japan incepted its Top Runner programme, designed to rejuvenate the lost momentum. Several years into the scheme, the programme, as a whole, seems generally to be perceived as successful by Japanese stakeholders.



The approach now attracts increasing attention outside of its country of origin. In 2005, the German Bundestag assigned to the federal government the task of promoting Top Runner policies also in Europe. However, the suitableness of the strategy is under debate, one reason being claims of potential conflicts with existing energy efficiency programmes.



Adopting a comparative stance, this presentation notes that Top Runner concept discussed in Europe and the original Japanese programme display fundamental differences. As in a game of Chinese whispers or Pass it down – where receivers of information interpret fragmented input by filling out gaps in ways that need not be in accordance at all with the original message – the Top Runner policy concept seems to have undergone significant change on its way from Japan to Germany. Nominally alike, the two approaches diverge on many accounts, for example in their implicit assumptions about stakeholder roles and responsibilities. Expounding on such variances this paper analyzes arguments from the debate about prospects for European Top Runner policies. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
energy efficiency standards, appliances, energy labels, Europe, Japan, market transformation
in
Proceedings of the eceee 2007 Summer Study: Saving energy – just do it!
pages
6 pages
publisher
European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE)
conference name
ECEEE 2007 Summer Study: Saving Energy -just do it!
project
AID-EE ( the Active Implementation of the proposed Directive on Energy Efficiency) project supported within the framework of the Energy Intelligence for Europe program
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1f336f92-c497-4609-bd59-7ce9088ee52f (old id 620199)
date added to LUP
2007-11-22 17:06:10
date last changed
2016-07-06 15:42:13
@inproceedings{1f336f92-c497-4609-bd59-7ce9088ee52f,
  abstract     = {In the 1990s, Japanese energy regulators were concerned by the fact that new generations of energy using appliances and products no longer displayed successive use-phase energy efficiency improvements, such as those that characterised product development in Japan after the 1970s oil crises. Therefore, in 1999, Japan incepted its Top Runner programme, designed to rejuvenate the lost momentum. Several years into the scheme, the programme, as a whole, seems generally to be perceived as successful by Japanese stakeholders.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The approach now attracts increasing attention outside of its country of origin. In 2005, the German Bundestag assigned to the federal government the task of promoting Top Runner policies also in Europe. However, the suitableness of the strategy is under debate, one reason being claims of potential conflicts with existing energy efficiency programmes.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Adopting a comparative stance, this presentation notes that Top Runner concept discussed in Europe and the original Japanese programme display fundamental differences. As in a game of Chinese whispers or Pass it down – where receivers of information interpret fragmented input by filling out gaps in ways that need not be in accordance at all with the original message – the Top Runner policy concept seems to have undergone significant change on its way from Japan to Germany. Nominally alike, the two approaches diverge on many accounts, for example in their implicit assumptions about stakeholder roles and responsibilities. Expounding on such variances this paper analyzes arguments from the debate about prospects for European Top Runner policies.},
  author       = {Nordqvist, Joakim},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the eceee 2007 Summer Study: Saving energy – just do it!},
  keyword      = {energy efficiency standards,appliances,energy labels,Europe,Japan,market transformation},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1209--1214},
  publisher    = {European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE)},
  title        = {The Top Runner policy concept: Pass it down?},
  year         = {2007},
}