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Species composition in northern wetlands may influence greenhouse gas fluxes

Ström, Lena LU and Christensen, Torben LU (2004) In Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift 98(6). p.313-316
Abstract
Global temperature has increased 0.6 degrees C over the last century due to a continuous increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Although the largest sources of greenhouse gases are anthropogenic, wetlands account for 25% of the total emission of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) making them the single largest natural source (75%) of this gas to the atmosphere. Through studies in southern and northern Sweden and in Greenland, we have shown that wetland plants have species-specific effects on the amount of methane that is emitted to the atmosphere. Our results point toward a direct and very important link between plant species diversity and the functioning of wetland ecosystems, and indicate that... (More)
Global temperature has increased 0.6 degrees C over the last century due to a continuous increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Although the largest sources of greenhouse gases are anthropogenic, wetlands account for 25% of the total emission of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) making them the single largest natural source (75%) of this gas to the atmosphere. Through studies in southern and northern Sweden and in Greenland, we have shown that wetland plants have species-specific effects on the amount of methane that is emitted to the atmosphere. Our results point toward a direct and very important link between plant species diversity and the functioning of wetland ecosystems, and indicate that changes in species composition may alter important processes relating to controls on and interactions between greenhouse gas fluxes. This will have significant implications for feedback mechanisms in a changing climate. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to specialist publication or newspaper
publication status
published
subject
categories
Popular Science
in
Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift
volume
98
issue
6
pages
313 - 316
publisher
Svenska Botaniska Föreningen
external identifiers
  • scopus:10944248754
ISSN
0039-646X
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
5ecb0da0-a28f-4eb9-9843-28af79fd7b39 (old id 620207)
date added to LUP
2007-12-17 13:35:26
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:52:54
@misc{5ecb0da0-a28f-4eb9-9843-28af79fd7b39,
  abstract     = {Global temperature has increased 0.6 degrees C over the last century due to a continuous increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Although the largest sources of greenhouse gases are anthropogenic, wetlands account for 25% of the total emission of the important greenhouse gas methane (CH4) making them the single largest natural source (75%) of this gas to the atmosphere. Through studies in southern and northern Sweden and in Greenland, we have shown that wetland plants have species-specific effects on the amount of methane that is emitted to the atmosphere. Our results point toward a direct and very important link between plant species diversity and the functioning of wetland ecosystems, and indicate that changes in species composition may alter important processes relating to controls on and interactions between greenhouse gas fluxes. This will have significant implications for feedback mechanisms in a changing climate.},
  author       = {Ström, Lena and Christensen, Torben},
  issn         = {0039-646X},
  language     = {swe},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {313--316},
  publisher    = {Svenska Botaniska Föreningen},
  series       = {Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift},
  title        = {Species composition in northern wetlands may influence greenhouse gas fluxes},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2004},
}