Advanced

Process Engineering Economics of Bioethanol Production

Galbe, Mats LU ; Sassner, Per LU ; Wingren, Anders and Zacchi, Guido LU (2007) In Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology 108. p.303-327
Abstract
This work presents a review of studies on the process economics of ethanol

production from lignocellulosic materials published since 1996. Our objective was to

identify the most costly process steps and the impact of various parameters on the fi-

nal production cost, e.g. plant capacity, raw material cost, and overall product yield,

as well as process configuration. The variation in estimated ethanol production cost is

considerable, ranging from about 0.13 to 0.81 US$ per liter ethanol. This can be explained

to a large extent by actual process differences and variations in the assumptions

underlying the techno-economic evaluations. The most important parameters for ... (More)
This work presents a review of studies on the process economics of ethanol

production from lignocellulosic materials published since 1996. Our objective was to

identify the most costly process steps and the impact of various parameters on the fi-

nal production cost, e.g. plant capacity, raw material cost, and overall product yield,

as well as process configuration. The variation in estimated ethanol production cost is

considerable, ranging from about 0.13 to 0.81 US$ per liter ethanol. This can be explained

to a large extent by actual process differences and variations in the assumptions

underlying the techno-economic evaluations. The most important parameters for the

economic outcome are the feedstock cost, which varied between 30 and 90US$ per

metric ton in the papers studied, and the plant capacity, which influences the capital

cost. To reduce the ethanol production cost it is necessary to reach high ethanol

yields, as well as a high ethanol concentration during fermentation, to be able to decrease

the energy required for distillation and other downstream process steps. Improved

pretreatment methods, enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis with cheaper and more effective

enzymes, as well as improved fermentation systems present major research challenges

if we are to make lignocellulose-based ethanol production competitive with sugar- and

starch-based ethanol. Process integration, either internally or externally with other types

of plants, e.g. heat and power plants, also offers a way of reducing the final ethanol

production cost. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bioethanol production · Biomass · Flowsheeting · Process economics
in
Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology
editor
Olsson, Lisbeth and
volume
108
pages
303 - 327
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000250578300012
  • scopus:34548775763
ISSN
0724-6145
ISBN
978-3-540-73650-9
DOI
10.1007/10_2007_063
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3f2b0a6b-1946-4a54-bc72-5469f2ff1003 (old id 627644)
date added to LUP
2007-11-30 11:16:47
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:45:03
@inbook{3f2b0a6b-1946-4a54-bc72-5469f2ff1003,
  abstract     = {This work presents a review of studies on the process economics of ethanol<br/><br>
production from lignocellulosic materials published since 1996. Our objective was to<br/><br>
identify the most costly process steps and the impact of various parameters on the fi-<br/><br>
nal production cost, e.g. plant capacity, raw material cost, and overall product yield,<br/><br>
as well as process configuration. The variation in estimated ethanol production cost is<br/><br>
considerable, ranging from about 0.13 to 0.81 US$ per liter ethanol. This can be explained<br/><br>
to a large extent by actual process differences and variations in the assumptions<br/><br>
underlying the techno-economic evaluations. The most important parameters for the<br/><br>
economic outcome are the feedstock cost, which varied between 30 and 90US$ per<br/><br>
metric ton in the papers studied, and the plant capacity, which influences the capital<br/><br>
cost. To reduce the ethanol production cost it is necessary to reach high ethanol<br/><br>
yields, as well as a high ethanol concentration during fermentation, to be able to decrease<br/><br>
the energy required for distillation and other downstream process steps. Improved<br/><br>
pretreatment methods, enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis with cheaper and more effective<br/><br>
enzymes, as well as improved fermentation systems present major research challenges<br/><br>
if we are to make lignocellulose-based ethanol production competitive with sugar- and<br/><br>
starch-based ethanol. Process integration, either internally or externally with other types<br/><br>
of plants, e.g. heat and power plants, also offers a way of reducing the final ethanol<br/><br>
production cost.},
  author       = {Galbe, Mats and Sassner, Per and Wingren, Anders and Zacchi, Guido},
  editor       = {Olsson, Lisbeth},
  isbn         = {978-3-540-73650-9},
  issn         = {0724-6145},
  keyword      = {Bioethanol production · Biomass · Flowsheeting · Process economics},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {303--327},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology},
  title        = {Process Engineering Economics of Bioethanol Production},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/10_2007_063},
  volume       = {108},
  year         = {2007},
}