Advanced

Thermal effects of steel toe caps in footgear

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Geng, Qiuqing and Holmér, Ingvar LU (1999) In International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 23(5-6). p.431-438
Abstract
This study investigated cold weather safety footwear and the possible thermal effects of steel toe caps in footwear. Two models of boots were used. Both models were manufactured in two variants - with and without steel toe cap. The boot insulation was measured with an artificial, heated foot (AHF). One model was used in experiment with subjects (n=6). Cold exposure consisted of sitting for 60 minutes at -10°C.

There were no differences between insulation levels of boots with and without steel cap for one boot model, but the differences were statistically significant for the second model showing slightly higher insulation values for the boot without steel cap. No significant differences due to insulation dissimilarities could be... (More)
This study investigated cold weather safety footwear and the possible thermal effects of steel toe caps in footwear. Two models of boots were used. Both models were manufactured in two variants - with and without steel toe cap. The boot insulation was measured with an artificial, heated foot (AHF). One model was used in experiment with subjects (n=6). Cold exposure consisted of sitting for 60 minutes at -10°C.

There were no differences between insulation levels of boots with and without steel cap for one boot model, but the differences were statistically significant for the second model showing slightly higher insulation values for the boot without steel cap. No significant differences due to insulation dissimilarities could be found from the measurements on subjects.

Statistically significant differences were found for both models regarding the rate of change of heat loss from AHF when its location was changed from warm to cold and back to warm. The rise and decrease of heat loss from AHF depended on the rate of temperature change of the boots. The results showed that a faster change in heat loss from AHF occurred for boots without steel toe caps. Data from subjects seemed to confirm this by a somewhat faster, though not significant, rise in toe skin temperatures after cold exposure in boots without steel toe caps. The effect may be attributed to the higher mass and heat contents of the boots with steel toe cap. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cold feet footwear insulation steel toe cap
in
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
volume
23
issue
5-6
pages
431 - 438
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0345040632
ISSN
0169-8141
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
829b81fa-5234-4980-b067-9be8b7858b64 (old id 633164)
date added to LUP
2008-02-21 14:31:14
date last changed
2017-05-14 04:12:32
@article{829b81fa-5234-4980-b067-9be8b7858b64,
  abstract     = {This study investigated cold weather safety footwear and the possible thermal effects of steel toe caps in footwear. Two models of boots were used. Both models were manufactured in two variants - with and without steel toe cap. The boot insulation was measured with an artificial, heated foot (AHF). One model was used in experiment with subjects (n=6). Cold exposure consisted of sitting for 60 minutes at -10°C.<br/><br>
There were no differences between insulation levels of boots with and without steel cap for one boot model, but the differences were statistically significant for the second model showing slightly higher insulation values for the boot without steel cap. No significant differences due to insulation dissimilarities could be found from the measurements on subjects.<br/><br>
Statistically significant differences were found for both models regarding the rate of change of heat loss from AHF when its location was changed from warm to cold and back to warm. The rise and decrease of heat loss from AHF depended on the rate of temperature change of the boots. The results showed that a faster change in heat loss from AHF occurred for boots without steel toe caps. Data from subjects seemed to confirm this by a somewhat faster, though not significant, rise in toe skin temperatures after cold exposure in boots without steel toe caps. The effect may be attributed to the higher mass and heat contents of the boots with steel toe cap.},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Geng, Qiuqing and Holmér, Ingvar},
  issn         = {0169-8141},
  keyword      = {cold feet footwear insulation steel toe cap},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5-6},
  pages        = {431--438},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics},
  title        = {Thermal effects of steel toe caps in footgear},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {1999},
}